Marie Curie Math & Science Center
 
CURRICULUM DESIGN
Louise Grabell, Group 5

Regents Earth Science, Grade 11

Commencement Content Standards
2. Students will access, generate, process, and transfer information using appropriate technologies.
4. Students will understand and apply scientific concepts, principles, and theories pertaining to tie physical setting and living environment and recognize the historical development of ideas in science.

Benchmark Content Standards
 2/1: Information technology is used to retrieve, process, and communicate information; and as a tool to enhance learning.
4/2: Many of the phenomena that we observe on Earth involve interactions among components of air, water, and land.
4/5: Energy and matter interact through forces that result in changes in motion.
 

Unit performance standards
1. Students will accurately collect, analyze, and interpret data for several local atmospheric variables.
2. Students will successfully integrate their data with the Earth Science Reference Tables charts and graphs.
3. Students will successfully retrieve data regarding atmospheric [meteorological] variables affecting a broader geographic region, and mesh with local data.4. Students will accurately describe weather changes/patterns.

Unit content standards or outcomes
1. Students will be able to collect temperature, barometric pressure, wind speed and direction, sky conditions, and precipitation data for the local region over a period of 5 consecutive days. [Computer probes should be used.]

2. Using computer technology [i.e. EXCEL], students will be able to chart and graph all collected data.

3. Students will be able to recognize the daily variability of collected data.

4. Students will be able to retrieve regional weather data for each of the five days.

5. Students will accurately diagram [create field maps] using regional weather data.

6. Students will be able to explain how the interactions between atmospheric variables create the familiar weather pattern known as a "cyclone".

7. Students will be able to explain the energy exchanges which cause the motions and changes within the atmosphere.

 
Performance measures for unit:

1.Student charts and graphs will be checked for accuracy.

Rubric:
1. Student is able to create data chart but not graph.
2. Student is able to create data chart and graph, but not accurately.
3. Student creates accurate data chart and graph.
4. Student is able to make predictions using the graph.

2. Students will be quizzed on their knowledge of each weather variable with reference to:
a. correct measurement
b. proper analysis
c. application of information

3. Through extensive laboratory exercises, students will be able to construct alternative models of weather patterns given a different set of data.

Rubric:
1. Student is able to plot data on a map, only.
2. Student is able to plot data, but field map constructions are inaccurate.
3. Student accurately plots and constructs field maps of all weather variables.
4. Student is able to make weather predictions based on maps.

4. Students will be tested on their ability to predict future weather based on observed data.

 
UNIT OUTLINE - WEATHER

This unit on weather will give students practical hands-on experience measuring and interpreting various atmospheric variables, and will culminate in their ability to make predictions about future weather based on accumulated data. The "lessons" vary in length and may require more than one class period.

Lesson #1: Learning how the equipment works!

 A. Using technology to measure and record local air temperature, barometric pressure, wind direction and speed, and humidity.
B. Learning how to describe local sky conditions.
C. Using EXCEL to organize data into charts and graphs.
D. Scheduling measurements for five consecutive days.
 

Associated Activities:

  • In small groups of no more than four students, the four weather variables are to be measured using computer-assisted probes or appropriate weather instruments.
  • Data is to be entered into EXCEL.
  • Regional weather data to be obtained through the INTERNET.

Lesson #2: Learning about temperature as a weather variable.

A. Using different temperature scales: Fahrenheit, Celsius, Kelvin.
B. Recognizing factors which affect temperature.
C. Drawing and interpreting isotherms and temperature on a station model

Associated Activities:

  • Students will collect local weather data and continue to enter into EXCEL.
  • Regional weather data to be obtained through INTERNET; students will reconcile their collected data with the regional reports.
  • On map provided, students will draw isotherm values.
  • Students will be quizzed on their understanding of the concept of temperature.

Lesson #3: Learning about air pressure as a weather variable.

A. Defining/understanding air pressure.
B. Recognizing factors which affect air pressure.
C. Drawing and interpreting isobars on a weather map.
D. Understanding a station model with respect to barometric pressure

Associated Activities:

  • Student groups will continue their daily data collections, both local and regional.
  • Students will reconcile local and regional data.
  • With map provided, students will draw isobars.
  • Students will be quizzed on their understanding of the concept of air pressure. 
    Lesson #4: Learning about the wind.
    A. Understanding the causes of wind.
    B. Understanding local, regional, and global winds.
    C. Understanding the coriolis force.
    D. Understanding cyclonic and anticyclonic flow on a weather map.
    E. Interpreting wind data on a station model.

Associated Activities:

  • Students will continue to collect local and regional weather data as previously instructed.
  • Students will reconcile local and regional weather data.
  • Using global outline provided by teacher, students will construct a map of the global wind patterns.
  • Using map provided by teacher, students will draw wind direction patterns and identify cyclonic and anticyclonic flow.
  • Students will be quizzed on their understanding of the concept of wind as an atmospheric variable.

Lesson #5: Learning about humidity as a weather variable.

A. Defining/understanding humidity.
B. Understanding relative humidity.
C. Understanding "dew point".
D. Understanding condensation/cloud formation.

Associated Activities:

  • Students will complete their last collection of local and regional data today.
  • Using EXCEL, all data will be graphed individually. Additionally, the variables of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity will be combined on one graph for analysis.
  • Students will be quizzed on their understanding of the concept of humidity as a weather variable. 

Lesson #6: Learning how air masses are identified.

A. Understanding how air masses are formed.
B. Discerning the differences between lows and highs.
C. Recognizing cyclones and anticyclones on a weather map.

Associated Activities:

  • Using EXCEL data, students will identify the type(s) of air mass[es] present locally over the past five days.
  • Students will chart the weather conditions associated with a high pressure system and a low pressure system.
  • Students will predict the incoming air mass as to @ and associated weather based on weather data obtained on the INTERNET.

Lesson #7: Learning about a middle latitude cyclone.

A. Understanding the characteristics of a middle latitude cyclone
B. Explaining front development and associated weather.
C. Defining the different types of fronts.

Associated Activities:

  • Students will complete the analysis of a synoptic weather map with regard to the variables of temperature, pressure, wind patterns, and precipitation patterns.
  • Students will locate the cold front and warm front associated with a middle latitude cyclone.
  • Students will describe the weather conditions associated with the fronts, and with other regions of the middle latitude cyclone.
  • Students will make predictions about the changes associated with the moving fronts of the cyclone.
  • Students will have a unit exam which will test their ability to apply the concepts of atmospheric variables to interpreting and predicting weather patterns (especially graphing) opportunities.
  • Applications that connect computer technology to other technological data recording and variable adjusting interfaces.
  • Applications that enable students to use multimedia in the implementation of activities and assessment tasks that match the MST standards.
  • Applications that will provide teachers and their students access to the resources of the Internet and local networks

 

 

St. Thomas Aquinas College, 125 Route 340, Sparkill NY 10976-1050