Marie Curie Math & Science Center
 
Patricia G. Grippo
Group # 1
Math - grade 9 self-contained Special Education

Commencement Content Standard:
Students will understand data analysis in the real world setting.

Benchmark Standard:
Students will understand and use data analysis to describe and compare data.

Content Standards:
Students will explore and produce graphic representations of data using calculators and computers.

Performance Standards:
Students will collect, analyze and compare data relating to sports events, stocks, time and money management. Students will construct graphs to interpret the data. Students will find the mean, median, mode and range of the set of data.

Content Outcomes:
Students will correctly identify the appropriate graph and measure of central tendency for the group of data.

Performance Measures: Students will be able to:

  • interpret and draw pictographs, bar graphs and line graphs
  • choose the more appropriate graph to display a set of data
  • recognize how bar graphs and line graphs can be misleading
  • find the mean, median, mode and range of a set of data
  • choose most appropriate measure of central tendency


GRAPHS AND DATA ANALYSIS

ENABLING ACTIVITIES The purpose of this project is to provide a connection between mathematics and the real world. Graphs are used in many places, such as magazines, newspapers, research journals, and daily news, reports. Bulletin board displays or graphical information that is readily available can be part of the unit. The collection of this material can be assigned as part of homework assignments, extra credit work or however best it can be incorporated into the unit.

These projects are geared for a ninth grade self contained math class. However, they can be easily modified by adjusting the amount of research and data to be collected. The teacher can make these adjustments based on the levels and abilities of the students within the class. They can be adapted for students to work independently, in pairs or in small groups.

Any unit based on data analysis and graphing from a ninth grade math curriculum can be used along with work books, text books and resource books for class work and homework assignments. Use of teacher made study guides, work sheets, quizzes and tests, standard chapter and unit tests are at the teacher's discretion. A rubric for the presentation assessment is included. It is suggested to use an overhead projector with graph overlays during instructional time with emphasis placed on the appropriate use for each type of graph and central tendency, and definitions of key terms. Some class time will be needed for group or individual time to work on the project and for teacher input. The instructor may want to break down the project assignments into an outline or list format in addition to the written instructions so the students have a clear understanding of what is expected.

Students will need to know how to use a data base program and a graphing program. They will need to have access to computers either in the classroom or in a computer lab. Therefore, a minimum of two class periods should be devoted to introducing students to the basics of each program This can be done prior to the beginning of this unit or it can be incorporated into the unit. Clear and simple instructions for using these programs should be in written form and distributed to the students so they have a visual reference as they are being instructed in "hands on" lessons.

 
A suggested course outline of the topic unit objectives is as follows:
 

Day 1:To interpret and draw pictographs.
Used to display numerical facts

2. To interpret single and double bar graphs.
Used to show comparisons

3. To interpret single and double line graphs.
Used to indicate trends or changes in data

4: To draw a bar or line graph for a given set of data.

5: Computer Lab - Data Base Program

6: To decide whether a bar graph or line graph would be more appropriate to display a set of data.

7: Group activity day

8: To recognize how bar graphs and line graphs can be misleading.

9: To find the mean, median, mode and range of a set of data.

10: To decide whether a given measure of central tendency is appropriate for a set of data.

11: Computer Lab - Graphing Program

12: Group activity day



GRAPHS AND DATA ANALYSIS

Group Project
Show Me The Money!

For this unit project students will choose five stocks and record their daily progress over a two week period. The source of this information must be documented. Additional information concerning last year's performance of these stocks must also be obtained through the INTERNET or a reference book. The INTERNET address or book title and page number must be documented.

All information will be recorded in a database set up by the group. The mean, median, mode and range must also be included. The group will decide how to organize this information.

The data base information will be organized into four different graphs, computer generated when possible. One graph must show a comparison. The group will decide how to organize this information and what types of graphs to use, The students will create two problems based on each graph for the class to solve. All data will be reported to the class with a discussion focusing on the significance of the data and basis of types of graphs chosen. Which graph best represents the collected data? Which measure of central tendency is most appropriate for the collected data? What conclusions can be made from the graphs? What predictions can be made?



GRAPHS AND DATA ANALYSIS

Group Project
Play Ball!

For this unit project the students will follow two baseball teams of their choice, recording wins, losses, scores, hits and runs. The source of this information must be documented. They will also access the INTERNET or a reference book to obtain similar recorded data on their teams from the previous year. The INTERNET address and title of reference book and page number must be documented.

All information will be recorded in a database set up by the group. The mean, median, mode and range must also be included. The group will decide how to organize this information.

The data base information will be organized into four different graphs, computer generated when possible. One graph must show a comparison. The group will decide how to organize this information and what types of graphs to use. The students will create two problems based on each graph for the class to solve. All data will be reported to the class with a discussion focusing on the significance of the data and basis of types of graphs chosen. Which graph best represents the collected data? Which measure of central tendency is appropriate for the data collected? What conclusions can be made from the graphs? What predictions can be made?



GRAPHS AND DATA ANALYSIS
Group Project
Money To Burn

For this unit project, students will document how much money they spend on specific items during a two week period. They will also access an additional resource to obtain national data for their same age group (14 - 16 yrs.). This source may be the INTERNET or a reference book. The INTERNET address must be documented and the title of the reference book and page number must be given.

 All information, both individual and national, will be recorded in a database set up by the group. The mean, median, mode and range must also be included. The group will decide how to organize this information.

The data base information will be organized into four different graphs, computer generated when possible. One graph must show a comparison. The group will decide how to organize this information and what types of graphs to use. The students will create two problems based on each graph for the class to solve. All data will be reported to the class with a discussion focusing on the significance of the data and basis of types of graphs chosen. Which graph best represents the collected data? Which measure of central tendency is appropriate for this data? What conclusions can be drawn from the graphs? What predictions can be made?

Areas of spending to be monitored

1. Food
2. Clothes
3. Drugs - this includes alcohol and tobacco
4. Music
5. Entertainment - this includes movies, bowling, skating, arcade etc.
6. Other



GRAPHS AND DATA ANALYSIS

Group Project
Nothing But Time

For this unit project students will document how much time they spend doing the following activities for a two week period. They will also access an additional source to obtain the latest national data for their same age group (14 -16yrs.of age). This source can be the INTERNET whereby the students must document the INTERNET address or, it can be a reference book whereby the title and page number must be documented.

All information, national and individual, will be recorded into a database set up by the group. The mean, median, mode and range are to be calculated and included. The group will decide how this database will organized.

The data base information will be organized into four different graphs, computer generated when possible. One graph must show a comparison. The group will decide how to organize this information and what types of graphs to use. The students will create two problems for the class to solve based on each graph. All data will be reported to the class with a discussion focusing on the significance of the data and the basis of types of graphs chosen. Which graph best represents the collected data? Which measure of central tendencv is appropriate for this data? What conclusions can be drawn from the graphs? What predictions can be made?

Suggested activities to be monitored

1. Watching television
2. Homework
3. After school activities - clubs, sports (include practice time and games), lessons, tutoring, volunteer work etc.
4. Working - paid position
5. Socializing - time spent with family and friends
6. Household chores
7. Talking on the telephone



GRAPH PRESENTATION RUBRIC
  1. Presentation is accurate, complete with title bar, numerical scale and categories properly placed. Meaning of symbols, keys and legends are extremely clear so viewer can easily analyze and interpret data.
  2. Presentation is virtually accurate. Meanings of symbols, keys and legends are clear so viewer can analyze and interpret data.
  3. Presentation contains some inaccuracies. Meanings of some symbols, keys and legends are clear while others are not.
  4. Presentation contains many inaccuracies. Meanings of symbols, keys and legends are unclear.
  5. Presentation lacks accuracy. Meanings of symbols, keys and legends are unclear.

 

 

St. Thomas Aquinas College, 125 Route 340, Sparkill NY 10976-1050