AMAG Presents Maya Shoshani: My Plastic Crush

Jan 22, 2018

AMAG Presents Maya Shoshani: My Plastic Crush

January 22 through February 25

Reception and Artist Talk
Wednesday, February 7 
4:30pm — 6:30pm

Maya Shoshani’s work envisions “plastic” as both a material and an idea. By sculpting domestic, suburban scenes from common building materials that are commercially fabricated to mimic other materials like wood and brick, Shoshani reflects “a place’s identity by using elements that are authentic to the environment.” In “My Plastic Crush,” the viewer encounters familiar images, like a generic gas station sign or the Shell icon, but these images are removed from their usual environment. This, in turn, lends the perception that they are fake: the real image, placed in an unfamiliar environment, no longer seems real. In her work, the authentic is difficult to define.

Furthermore, Shoshani’s use of archetypal images of the suburban American Dream, like a white picket fence, A-frame houses, and flowers, evoke the concepts of “place” and “home.” Her sculptures are neither laudatory nor dismissive of the collective American Dream. Instead of venerating or mocking the desire for that “white picket fence,” her reflective materials reflect our desires and dreams back to us.

 

 
collage of artist work

January 22 through February 25

Reception and Artist Talk
Wednesday, February 7 
4:30pm — 6:30pm

Maya Shoshani’s work envisions “plastic” as both a material and an idea. By sculpting domestic, suburban scenes from common building materials that are commercially fabricated to mimic other materials like wood and brick, Shoshani reflects “a place’s identity by using elements that are authentic to the environment.” In “My Plastic Crush,” the viewer encounters familiar images, like a generic gas station sign or the Shell icon, but these images are removed from their usual environment. This, in turn, lends the perception that they are fake: the real image, placed in an unfamiliar environment, no longer seems real. In her work, the authentic is difficult to define.

Furthermore, Shoshani’s use of archetypal images of the suburban American Dream, like a white picket fence, A-frame houses, and flowers, evoke the concepts of “place” and “home.” Her sculptures are neither laudatory nor dismissive of the collective American Dream. Instead of venerating or mocking the desire for that “white picket fence,” her reflective materials reflect our desires and dreams back to us.

 

 

Maya Shoshani was born in Atlanta, raised on a kibbutz in Israel, and currently lives and works in New York City. Her work has been exhibited in New York and Georgia. Although her academic training focuses on the arts, she has also been involved in different businesses and worked as a teacher in various capacities.


For more information about the Azarian McCullough Art Gallery go to stac.edu/amag.