stac_logo
arts & aciences
 

spacer

Academic Programs

Our Faculty

Student Opportunities

Alumni Achievers

News & Events

 

spacerARTS AND SCIENCES COURSES

ART

ART 101: Introduction to Art An introductory course that studies the major forms of artistic expression (drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture and design) and introduces the aesthetic tools used to critically evaluate and appreciate these forms. Course activities include lectures, student presentations and several studio sessions.

ART 200: Special Workshops Offered regularly to broaden students’ art experience. Topics vary.

ART 202: Introduction to Painting
In this class basic skills in oil and acrylic paint are introduced. Students engage traditional/historical uses of paint and painting tools. Research and experimentation expand students painting vocabulary and clarify historical and personal choices. Course is available to non majors as Pass/Fail. ART 203: Two Dimensional Design An introductory studio course that explores the theories and practice of arranging traditional two dimensional media (pencil, charcoal, pen, block print ink, paint, decorative papers/foils) on paper, as well as the creative strategies necessary to bring creative works into being. Course activities include weekly projects, critiques, and technical demonstrations.

ART 204: Three Dimensional Design An introductory studio class that explores the theory and practice of arranging volumetric and spatial media (folded paper, wood, mat board, dowels, stone, plaster maché) to create a variety of works. Course activities include biweekly projects, critiques, and technical demonstrations.

ART 205: Drawing I In this istudio drawing course the emphasis is on observational drawing through experience with traditional drawing techniques and materials. The primary processes of contour, gesture, perspective, and value drawing will be covered. In addition, the ideas of composition, line quality, form/space construction, and use of critical analysis will be introduced and practiced.

ART 210: Photography I Basic course in black and white still photography. Development of skills in the use of cameras, films, and darkroom procedures.

ART 211: Photography II An exploration of photographic fine art alternative process techniques (hand coloring, toning, Polaroid transfers, liquid emulsion). Continued hands on darkroom work. An introduction to the use of studio lighting. Prerequisite: ART 210 or permission of instructor.

ART 215: Introduction to Printmaking An introductory studio course that explores basic planographic, relief and intaglio processes used to create: monoprints, silkscreens, linoleum cuts (single and composite), acrylic engravings and copper etchings. Course activities include creating and refining print designs, creating “plates” and “blocks,” series printings and class critiques.


ART 216: Introduction to Ceramics
An introductory studio course that investigates the medium of clay and its potential to create ceramic objects that are functional and/or sculptural. Basic hand forming techniques (“slab” “pinch” “coil” etc.) are used. Projects are glazed. Course activities include creating designs, weekly or biweekly projects and class critiques.

ART 217: Introduction to Sculpture An introductory studio course that explore the basic materials, techniques and working strategies used to create sculptural forms in terra cotta, plaster, paper maché, metal, zonolite stone and wood. Works created investigate representation, distortion, abstraction and non-objectivity. Course activities include creating designs, biweekly projects and class critiques.

ART 218: Graphic Design I (Formerly Theory and Visualization) In this studio course, emphasis is placed on the fundamental principles, theory and elements of graphic design. Through a variety of exercises and projects students will learn the creative process from concept to execution and the vocabulary needed to effectively critique visual communication. Illustrator and Photoshop programs are used. Prerequisites: ART 233 and ART 203 or ART 205 or permission of instructor.

ART 219: Art as Therapy An overview of the history and application of art therapy. It will examine art’s application to clinical treatment serving as an alternative to verbal expression. The creative process will be explored as a pathway to: greater self awareness; understanding how art is conceptualized; utilizing art for self healing. Lecture and experiential projects promote this understanding.

ART 227: Computer Studio I
This is an introductory computer studio in Macintosh OSX with an emphasis on a basic understanding of programs in Adobe's Creative Suite and iLife.

ART 228: History of Graphic Design The evolution of visual communications from earliest times to the present noting important historical developments, including the invention of writing which laid the foundation for graphic design. Prerequisite: ART 227.

ART 229: Techniques and Methods in Therapeutic Art The therapeutic properties of several artistic mediums and techniques; the populations and stages of development for which each is conducive; and how each material can be used to promote health and self expression. Discussions and research of various psychological theories and how art therapists apply these theories to their work.

ART 231: Introduction to Computer Art An introduction and exploration of the Macintosh computer for non-art majors as a tool and medium in art, visual communications and personal expression. No prerequisites.

ART 232: Art History Survey
A general survey of the major periods of art, and architecture from Prehistory to current times. Art is analyzed as aesthetic and social products as part of, and contributing to the overall social, political, and aesthetic ideas of the time. Emphasis is on historic and cultural context, as well as, evolution of artistic style.

ART 233: Foundations in Theory and Practice In this seminar course emphasis is on idea development and the creative process. The importance of research into diverse subjects as well as contemporary art and artists will be emphasized. Tactics in creativity and experiences with creative problem solving will be engaged.

ART 237: Typography
Through directed projects, students will explore type design and its practical applications in order to produce expressive and conceptual projects with type. Students will develop an appreciation for the artistry of typographic forms and an in-depth knowledge of typographic terminology. Prerequisites: ART 233 and ART 203 or ART 205 or permission of instructor.

ART 240: Digital Photography
An introduction to digital photography that incorporates important aspects of traditional photography including cameral use, framing, depth of field, light, and design, with the essential basics inherent in the transfer from film to digital technology. Students will execute a series of projects designed to enhance visual awareness and develop conceptual problem solving through photography. The Macintosh Photoshop program will be used to edit, color correct and alter photos.

ART 241: Self Expression Workshop
A studio class that explores an expressive approach to art therapy. Expressionist artists will be discussed, as well as other artists who have used art as a means for emotional release. Varied art mediums and assignments will be introduced.

ART 290: Sophomore Art Seminar A course for art majors that endeavors to identify and focus personal artistic goals through readings, presentations, lectures, discussions and talks by visiting arts professionals. These activities collectively investigate basic aesthetic questions and creative overviews, a knowledge of which can facilitate productive studio work, academic study and career preparation.

ART 302: Intermediate Painting
This studio painting course is designed to develop the perceptual and technical painting skills introduced in Painting I while solving more formally and conceptually complex problems. The development of a personal and cultural aesthetic will be emphasized. Required reading and writing assignments will support and clarify a personal direction and point of view. Prerequisite: ART 202.

ART 305: Intermediate Ceramics
An intermediate studio course that continues to explore the creative possibilities of the processes experienced in ART 216. Students research and develop their own creative ideas and work schedules with the instructor’s guidance. Prerequisites: ART 216 or permission of the instructor.

ART 308: Intermediate Sculpture
An intermediate studio course that continues to explore the sculptural potential of the materials and processes experienced in ART 217. Students research and develop their own creative ideas and work schedules with the instructor’s guidance. Prerequisites: ART 217 and ART 204 or ART 205.

ART 309: Developmental Art Therapy An exploration of the stages of personality development and the evolution of the creative process as the individual develops from a child to an adult. Parallels will be drawn among the child’s stages of graphic, cognitive, and social emotional development. Students will be encouraged to explore their own creative self-expression, as well as to closely examine children’s art work. Prerequisite: ART 219 or permission of the instructor.


ART 311: Intermediate Printmaking
An intermediate studio course that continues to explore the processes introduced in ART 215. Students research and develop their own creative ideas and work schedules with the instructor’s guidance. Prerequisites: ART 215 and ART 205 or permission of the instructor.

ART 322: Graphic Design II This course emphasizes concept development in addition to theory and creative process. Through directed projects students will research, write creative work plans, and develop design that is highly conceptual and on target with creative work plans. Software used but not limited to: Illustrator, Photoshop and/or InDesign. Prerequisites: ART 218 or permission of instructor. Prerequisites: ART 218 or permission of instructor

ART 323: Art Direction
This course is designed to give the students a “real world” learning experience. Throughout the semester students will be working in teams to develop a unique design solution for a real client. Students will learn how to develop a creative brief, manage workflow, generate ideas as a team, present to a client professionally, and create a successful design package for a client. Prerequisites: ART 218, ART 227 or ART 231, ART 237.

ART 325: Applications of Art Therapy
This course is designed to expose the student to the applications of art therapy to diverse populations. The students will explore the use of various techniques, materials and approaches while considering the special needs of individuals and groups. The student will have contact with art therapists, both in the field and in the classroom, who specialize in working with specific populations. Prerequisite: ART 219 or permission of instructor.

ART 327: Computer Studio II In this intermediate computer studio students learn advanced computer skills and techniques related to the industry standard, Adobe Creative Suite. In particular, Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator are used. Prerequisites: ART 227 or permission of instructor.

ART 330: Twentieth Century Art History A study of painting, sculpture and architectural forms as well as the role of technology and materials in the art of the 20th century.

ART 331: Drawing II
Advancing the perceptual and technical drawing skills developed in Drawing I, Drawing II will be presented more broadly to include conceptual, narrative, personal and collaborative directions, building processes that lead to more refined and complex drawings. The introduction of contemporary concerns and approaches will be explored. Prerequisite: ART 205 or permission of instructor.

ART 332: Figure Drawing
Through observational drawing students use various historical methods to describe the rhythms and structures of the human figure. The primary modes used are: gesture, sighting and measuring, planer analysis, contour drawing, anatomical analysis, and both optical and planer use of value. Various methods of representing the figure will be addressed including the development of creative concepts in representing the human body. Prerequisite: ART 205 or permission of instructor. Art majors will be given enrollment preference.

ART 335: Web Design Developing the necessary technical, theoretical, and design skills to create user sensitive websites, students learn how to plan and design web pages and how to develop efficient navigation of a website. XHTML, CSS and Flash are discussed, Adobe Dreamweaver and Photoshop are used as the web authoring software. Prerequisites: ART 327 or permission of instructor.

ART 345: Digital Media Art
In this course various fields generally grouped together as the ‘digital arts’ are examined. This will include digital photo and computer image manipulation, use of still images to build a time-based film and simple video film editing including sound. Project assignments will concentrate on the acquisition of basic imaging and multimedia skills, and the aesthetics of digital art as an expressive art form. Students have access to video and sound editing programs within the digital imaging lab but must provide their own digital and/or video cameras. Prerequisite: ART 227, 231, or 340 or permission.

ART 350: Portfolio in Art
Students develop, exhibit, and defend a consistent and relevant body of work based on mature concepts and well-developed ideas relevant to his/her study. In addition to the artwork, supporting paper, artist’s statement, professional documentation, and installation plan are required. Designed for upper-level art students who produce work leading to a professional portfolio and Senior Exhibition. Prerequisites: limited to students in their junior or senior year.

ART 375H: Aesthetic Development Through Design A course designed for honors students that explores the media, techniques and expressive potential of two dimensional design. Weekly projects demonstrate an understanding of these and a method of critical evaluation. More advanced projects – informed by a knowledge of chosen trends in modern or contemporary art - reflect personal aesthetic interests. Course activities include weekly projects, advanced projects, technical demonstrations, student presentations and class critiques.

ART 401: Special Projects Studio and/or history course for advanced students who wish to carry out a special project under supervision. A proposal of work must be submitted by the student and accepted by a member of the art faculty. It may deal with the exploration of new processes and materials, or it may be more advanced work in an area of competence.

ART 402: Advanced Painting
This advanced studio painting course further builds skills and processes, including research, that lead to a more refined and complex painting practice. Contemporary concerns and approaches are clarified and their processes, form, craft, and content are refined. Prerequisite: ART 302 ART 205 or permission.

ART 403: Internship in Graphic Design An opportunity to gain first-hand experience in a job-related situation. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor.

ART 407: Drawing III
This advanced studio drawing course further builds drawing and conceptualization processes, including research that leads to a more refined and complex drawing practice. Contemporary concerns and approaches are emphasized aiding students in preparation for the development of an individualized body of work. Prerequisite: ART 331 or permission.

ART 410: Internship in Therapeutic Art
Students observe and apply the use of art therapy under the supervision of a practicing art therapist or other approved clinician in a selected human services facility. The internship provides an opportunity for students to apply the theory and creative methods learned as an art therapy major. The student will spend 120 hours at their field placement site.

ART 411: Internship in Fine Art A semester long internship with an approved professional art institution provides students with the opportunity to experience a real work environment. Students work in a supervised setting, assisting with arts production, administration, outreach, education, exhibition preparation, and/or art handling. Students will keep a regular work schedule and record of activities with reports to their advisor. One hundred hours (for 3 credits) is required. (45 completed credit hours and advisor approval).

ART 420: Graphic Design III Through directed projects students examine principles of marketing, branding and corporate identity design. Students design consumer labels, logos, letterhead, packages, and other elements of corporate identity design including web presence. Business and contemporary design theories as well as how they relate to relevant social theories is included. Prerequisites: ART 227, ART 228, ART 322, and ART 335 or permission of instructor.

ART 424: Portfolio Development
This course is the concluding step in preparing students for a career in visual communications. Under the direction of the graphic design faculty, students complete a competitive portfolio and learn skills needed to succeed in the interview process. Capstone course, required for graphic design majors, must be taken during last semester and may be repeated. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

ART 430: Art Therapy Seminar
Designed to be taken in tandem with ART 410, providing students supervision and research training for entry into the professional arena. Topics include the development of professional portfolios and the application of research to professional forms of conduct and tasks within a clinical setting.
The following three (3) credit art courses may be offered if student demand is sufficient: ART 201 Creative Experiences for Non-Art Majors, ART 212 Creative Textiles; ART 213-214 Jewelry Making I & II; ART 221 Engineering Design; ART 225* Nineteenth Century European Art, 313 Puppet Making; ART 314 Ceramic Technology; ART 315 Watercolor, ART* 317 American Art, ART 340 Editorial Design, ART 405* Non-Western Art *In addition to slide lectures and discussions, these courses may include the critical evaluation of original works in New York City art galleries and museums.

ASTRONOMY

ASTR 101: Modern Mysteries of Astronomy
Contemporary problems in astronomy: black holes, cosmic evolution, life in the universe, pulsars, quasars. Lecture course.

ASTR 201: The Astronomical Universe I (4 credits)
Historical astronomy, the solar system, astronomical tools, stars, stellar evolution and systems, galaxies, and cosmology. Three lecture hours, two laboratory hours per week.

ASTR 300: Special Topics
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

BIOLOGY

BIO 101: Human Biology
Structure and function of the major systems of the human body and how they interact. Students who received credit for BIO 150 or BIO 301 – 302 cannot receive credit for this course. Lecture course.

BIO 102: Nutritional Biology
An introduction to the basic concepts in the field of nutrition. This course may help students understand the dangers of obesity, malnourishment, as well as why the nutrients listed on a nutritional fact label is important to human health. Topics include the fundamentals of nutrition, nutritional and disease prevention, weight management, malnutrition, hunger, and current issues and research related to these topics. For non-science majors only. Lecture course.

BIO 105: Drugs & Modern Society
An introduction to the definition of the term drug, the different classes of drugs, and how drugs affect the body and mind. This course may help students understand the dangers of addiction as well as the harms of different drugs on the human body. The focus will be on psychoactive drugs including psychotherapeutic drugs and drugs of abuse. Topics will also include tolerance and dependence to drugs, consequences of drug use, and the treatment and prevention of substance-related disorders. For non-science majors only. Lecture course.

BIO 111: Animal Behavior
The physiological, ecological and evolutionary aspects of animal behavior. Lecture course.

BIO 120: Introduction To Human Disease and Microbes
Introduction to the microbial world including those organisms that are part of the normal flora in humans, organisms that cause disease such as food poisoning, Strep throat, and the flu, and those organisms necessary for the production of food such as yogurt and cheese. For non-science majors only. Three lecture hours per week.

BIO 130: Environmental Biology
The basic structure and function of the ecosystem and how human activity affects it. Lecture course.

BIO 140: Marine Biology
Characteristics and natural history of major groups of marine organisms, factors that affect life in the ocean including nutrient and light levels, ecology of selected marine ecosystems. Three lecture hours per week.

BIO 150: Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology (4 credits)
Form and function of the human body will be studied at a level suitable for non-biology majors. Students who receive credits for BIO 301 or 302 cannot receive credit for this course. 3 lecture hours plus two lab hours per week.

BIO 171: General Biology I
Introduction to biological principles including biomolecules, cell structures and division, photosynthesis and the characteristics of bacteria, fungi and plants and their role in the ecosystem. Three lecture hours and one recitation hour per week. Corequisite: BIO 173 [Previously BIO 201].

BIO 172: General Biology II
Introduction to biological principles including bioenergetics, gene expression, evolution and the structure and function of the major animal groups. Three lecture hours and one recitation hour per week. Corequisite: BIO 174 [Previously BIO 202].

BIO 173: General Biology Lab I (1 credit)
Introduction to laboratory and field methods including experiments designed to complement the topics in BIO 201. A student research project is included. Two lab hours per week. Corequisite: BIO 171 [Previously BIO 211].

BIO 174: General Biology Lab II (1 credit)
Introduction to laboratory and field methods including experiments designed to complement the topics in BIO 202. A student research project is included. Two lab hours per week. Corequisite: BIO 172 [Previously BIO 212]

BIO 251: Anatomy and Physiology I (4 credits)
Structure and function of the human body with emphasis on the organ system level of organization. Skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system. Three lecture hours, Two lab hours per week. Prerequisites: “C” grade or better in BIO 171,172, 173,and 174 [Previously BIO 301].

BIO 252: Anatomy and Physiology II (4 credits)
Continuation of BIO 301 with emphasis on the structure and function of the circulatory, excretory, respiratory and reproductive systems. Three lecture hours, two lab hours per week. Prerequisite: BIO 251 [Previously BIO 302].

BIO 300: Special Topics
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

BIO 307: Microbiology (4 credits)
The classification, morphology, physiology, identification, and control of microorganisms with emphasis on those of medical importance to humans. Three lecture hours, three lab hours per week. Prerequisites: “C” grade or better in BIO 171, 172, 173, and 174 and CHEM 172 and 174.

BIO 309: Biophysics
(Also offered as PHY 309) The applications of the laws of physics to principles and problems of the life sciences. The physics of living systems in statics, mechanics, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, sound, electricity, and atomic physics. Lecture course. Prerequisites: “C” grade or better in PHY 201 and 202.

BIO 311: Parasitiology
Exploration of the life cycle, transmission, and epidemiology of human parasites and a few animal parasites. Case studies will be examined identifying, symptoms, diagnosis and treatments. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: “C” grade or better in BIO 171, 172, 173, and 174.

BIO 317: Ecology (4 credits)
The structure and function of ecosystems. Three lecture hours, three lab hours per week. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in BIO 171, 172, 173, and 174.

BIO 325: Bioinformatics
(Also offered as CS 320) A project based approach to learning bioinformatics with an interdisciplinary focus on programming and biology.

BIO 350: Genetics (4 credits)
This course is a thorough examination of the basic fundamentals of genetics and their application to modern-day issues. Major topics include: structure and function of genes, Mendelian and non-mendelian genetics, cellular division pathways, prokaryotic and eukaryotic chromosomal structure and gene expression, DNA structure and replication, transcription, translation and gene/DNA mutation. Special topics including cloning, stem cell, research and the genetic basis of disease. Laboratory topics include DNA fingerprinting, PCR, gene transformation, fruit fly genetics and gene sequencing. Prerequisites: CHEM 172 and BIO 252.

BIO 400: Independent Study (1-3 credits)
Qualified students may, under the supervision of a faculty member, pursue independent study and/or research on selected topics of special interest to the student and the faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of Chairperson.

BIO 403: Biochemistry (4 credits)
(Also offered as CHEM 403. See CHEM 403 for course description.)

BIO 404: Cell and Molecular Biology (4 credits)
Structure and function of eukaryotic cells including protein structure and function, energy and signal transduction, and intracellular and inter cellular transport. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 172 and BIO 252.

BIO 405: Forensic Biology (4 credits)
(Also offered as FS 405. See FS 405 for course description.)

BIO 406: Immunology
Systems of defense against disease including antigen structure and presentation, antibody synthesis and function, innate and cellular immunity, and how body defenses are coordinated. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: “C” grade or better in BIO 171, 172, 173, and 174 and CHEM 252.

BIO 407: Biochemistry II (4 credits)
Second course in a two-semester sequence in the fundamentals of biochemistry. Course addresses the complexity of metabolism. Special attention is given to the control and regulation of several metabolic pathways and the clinical aspects of diseases such as cancer and several gastrointestinal disorders. Prerequisite: BIO/CHEM 403.

BIO 450-455: Medical Technology Clinical Education (15 credits)
Twelve month period of academic and clinical training in a school of medical technology approved by the American Medical Association and the American Society of Clinical Pathologists.

CHEMISTRY

CHEM 101: Elements of Chemistry I
An introduction to atomic theory, chemical bonding, states of matter, chemical and nuclear reactions, solutions, acid- base theory and oxidation-reduction for students not majoring in science or engineering. Two hours lecture and two hours lab per week.

CHEM 102: Elements of Chemistry II
An introduction to organic chemistry and compounds of carbon; polymers toxicity, food and nutrition, medicinal and pharmaceutical chemistry. Two hours lecture and two hours lab per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 101.

CHEM 105 : Drugs and Modern Society
(Also offered as BIO 105. See BIO 105 for course description.)

CHEM 171: General Chemistry I
The basic principles of chemistry: the theory of atomic and molecular structure and the nature of the chemical bond, periodicity of the elements, energy-mass relationships, states of matter and the chemistry of solutions. Three lecture hours and one recitation hour per week. Corequisite: CHEM 173 [Previously CHEM 201].

CHEM 172: General Chemistry II
The continuation of CHEM 201. Thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, oxidation reduction reactions, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry. Three lecture hours and one recitation hour per week. Corequisite: CHEM 174. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in CHEM 171 and 173 [Previously CHEM 202].

CHEM 173: General Chemistry Lab I (1 credit)
Mass relationships, gas laws, heat systems, periodicity and molecular structures. Some exercises are open inquiry. Three lab hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 171 [Previously CHEM 211].

CHEM 174: General Chemistry Lab II (1 credit)
Introduction to kinetics, equilibrium systems, acid-base reactions, the theory and practice of qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis. Three lab hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 172 Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in CHEM 171 and 173 [Previously CHEM 212].

CHEM 251: Organic Chemistry I (4 credits)
The relationship between structure and reaction of the various classes of carbon compounds with emphasis on reaction mechanisms. The preparation, separation and purification of representative organic compounds. Three lecture hours per week; 45 lab hours per semester. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in CHEM 172 and 174 or the equivalent [Previously CHEM 401].

CHEM 252: Organic Chemistry II (4 credits)
The continuation of CHEM 401. The reactions of aromatic compounds, carbonyl compounds, aminoes, and their derivatives. Synthesis and identification of organic compounds. Three lecture hours per week; 45 lab hours per semester. Prerequisite: CHEM 251 or its equivalent [Previously CHEM 402].

CHEM 300: Special Topics
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

CHEM 301: Quantitative Chemical Analysis (4 credits)
Introduction to the theory and methods of quantitative chemical analysis. Three lecture hours, three lab hours per week. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in CHEM 172.

CHEM 302: Instrumental Methods of Analysis (4 credits)
The fundamentals of instrumentation in chemical analysis. Three lecture hours, three lab hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 301 (Offered occasionally)

CHEM 305: Materials Science
(Also offered as PHY 305. See PHY 305 for course description.)

CHEM 310: Physical Chemistry
Consideration is given to some important concepts in physical chemistry including the laws of thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, phase equilibria and the phase rule, atomic and molecular structure. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in CHEM 172 and CHEM 174 and MATH 109 or the equivalent.

CHEM 400: Independent Study 1
Qualified students may, under the supervision of a faculty member, pursue independent study and/or research on selected topics of special interest to the student and faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the Division Chairperson.

CHEM 403: Biochemistry (4 credits)
This course examines in detail the structure and function of all major biomolecules, [including proteins, carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids) as well as the regulation and organization of several metabolic pathways. Special emphasis is given to enzyme kinetics and their mechanisms, protein structure/function relationships as well as the biochemical basis for human disease. Metabolic pathways are examined from a thermodynamic and regulatory perspective. Laboratory topics include column chromatography, protein assays, western blot analysis, ELISA and enzyme kinetic assays. This provides the linkage between the inanimate world of chemistry and the living world of biology. Prerequisite: CHEM 252 and BIO 251.

CHEM 407: Instrumental Methods of Analysis & Microscopy (4 credits)
(Also offered as FS 407. See FS 407 for course description.)

COMMUNICATION ARTS

CA 101: Speech Communication
Principles of speech organization, presentation, and voice improvement. The nature of speech, the importance of active listening, and communication process and theory will be emphasized.

CA 150: Broadcast Practicum (credit varies)
Supervised field experience in either television or radio. Each unit of credit requires a minimum of 60 clock hours in an assigned practicum. Free elective credit only. A maximum of three credits allowed.

CA 160: Journalism Practicum (credit varies)
Supervised work experience with the College newspaper. Each unit of credit requires a minimum of 60 clock hours in an assigned practicum. Free elective credit only. A maximum of three credits allowed.

CA 170: Yearbook Practicum (credit varies)
Supervised work experience with the College yearbook. Each unit of credit requires a minimum of 60 clock hours in an assigned practicum. Free elective credit only. A maximum of three credits allowed.

CA 199: Theatre Practicum (1 credit)
Provides performing arts students the opportunity for hands-on learning associated with aspects of theatre production with the Laetare Players, the St. Thomas Aquinas College theatre company. Students may choose one area of production on which to base their practicum during any given semester. Areas may include performing a major role, set construction, costume design, lighting design, sound design, box office/marketing and others.

CA 200: Special Studies in Communications
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

CA 201: Oral Interpretation of Literature
An exploration of the use of vocal expression to convey the emotional message of prose, poetry and drama. Students learn how to select, analyze, critically listen to, and perform literature. Prerequisite: CA 101.

CA 203: Public Speaking
An intermediate level course that emphasizes the role of oral communication in contemporary society. Practice in responding articulately to issues, active listening, and recognition of the importance of non-verbal communication. Prerequisite: CA 101.

CA 204: Studies In Culture
This course will present an in-depth view of a civilization from several perspectives. On-site visits to cultural sites will provide a unique view of the civilization. Permission of instructor required.

CA 205: Broadcast Announcing
Oral communication for radio and television in the various formats required by the industry: news, commercials, public relations, music, discussion, and sports. FCC rules governing announcing. Critical evaluation of audio and video-taped performances.

CA 210: Introduction to Journalism
Overview of journalism: the gathering, writing and evaluation of well-rounded news, feature, and editorial material. Objectivity, media ethics, First vs. Sixth Amendments, and legal considerations will be discussed. Prerequisite: English 102.

CA 213: Content Development for Public Relations
Overview of the public relations function with particular emphasis on writing for the achievement of specific purposes. Public relations theory and practice, trade publications, media advertising, publics and public opinion, research and budgeting. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

CA 214: Introduction to Magazine Article Writing
Focus on writing for magazines. Learn how to write a good query letter, how to get information from sources and how to construct a well-developed article. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

CA 216: Film Appreciation
A study of the motion picture medium, the aesthetics of film art and the collaborative nature of the industry. Development of understanding of film’s symbolic language as means for evaluating a film’s merits, and increasing appreciation of the film experience.

CA 217: Film History
The evolution of the motion picture as a medium and as an art form from the late 1800’s to the 1950’s through selected readings, screenings, discussions of major film movements and analysis of classic films.

CA 219: Modern Movies: 1950-present
Developments in the narrative film since 1950 examined through the analysis of a variety of contemporary, international films representing significant advances in the medium’s expressive language and reflecting values and cultural views of a changing world.

CA 220: Introduction to Mass Media
The study of communication theories and mass media to foster the development of informed citizens, effective communicators, and more intelligent consumers of mass media.

CA 221: TV Studio Production I
The course covers the fundamentals of TV studio production. Class work and a hands-on approach will familiarize the student with skills such as scriptwriting, camera operations, audio mixing, producing and directing, and live performance.

CA 230: History and Development of Mass Media
A study of the evolution of communications media. It will focus on the historical development of media, economic structures, and the implications of new technologies.

CA 240: New Media Communications
This course will explore how media technology has altered our way of life over time, with an emphasis on recent technological changes. It will also explore technological determinism vs. social determinism. Does technology change society or does society change technology? Is technology an extension of the human (early Marshall McLuhan) or is it an autonomous force that alters communication and thus, patterns of behavior. Students will explore the effects of technology on business and marketing, politics and war, education and learning, social behavior and perception, family life, language and writing, relationships and dating, publishing, literature, and art. They will consider whether new media, in particular social media, have expanded our knowledge base or caused information overload. They will also look at the consequences of the emerging Web 3.0 platform, which includes mobile communications.

CA 300: Special Topics
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

CA 301: Broadcast Journalism
A study of broadcast news reporting, writing, and presentation. Laboratory and field exercises in writing, reporting, editing, and preparing radio and television newscasts.

CA 305: Basic Principles of Acting and Directing
Introduction to theatre production and performance. Includes script analysis, acting, voice, movement, spatial orientation, sound, color, light, direction, motivation, technical precision, and house management.
CA 309: Radio Broadcasting
Introduction to radio station operations, management, promotion, economics, programming and FCC rules governing radio operations. Prerequisite: CA 220.

CA 310: Writing for Broadcast Media
The course focuses on television and radio scriptwriting. Script formats and content of persuasive, informative and entertainment scriptwriting will be covered. Prerequisite: CA 210.

CA 312: Communication Skills in Business
Practical application of communication theory to a sequence of projects progressing from writing of memoranda, letters and resumes to more advanced problems of persuasion, interviewing, research and proposal and report writing. Prerequisite: ENG 102. Recommended for juniors and seniors.

CA 314: Sports Media
Overview of coverage of sports by all media: print, radio, television, and electronic. Study of sports coverage through lectures, analysis of tapes, field trips, and guest speakers.

CA 315: Electronic Field Production
The pre-production, videotaping, and editing of on-location, camcorder video reports and video stories. Fundamentals of in-camera editing will provide the knowledge of electronic camcorder journalism.

CA 316: The Great Filmmakers
Study of a representative body of films by one or more master filmmakers. Past semesters focused upon Hitchcock, Woody Allen, Bergman, Scorsese, Kubrick, and Spielberg.

CA 320: Media Law and Ethics
Examination of the central legal and ethical concerns and issues encountered by journalists and other professional communicators, beginning with constitutional protections and freedoms. Prerequisite: CA 220.

CA 322: Advanced Public Relations
Provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of the skills, techniques, and knowledge required to conceptualize, plan, and carry out an event. The focus of the advanced course is to look and understand niche areas of public relations, specifically crisis communication, corporate communication, and event planning.

CA 325: TV Studio Production II
An advanced level TV studio production course. Digital filmmaking and editing will be introduced. Commercials, Public Service Announcements and creative narratives will be required projects for all students in this class. Prerequisite: CA 221.

CA 326: Advanced Journalism
News and feature writing for the print media. Newsgathering, investigative reporting, headlining, captioning, layout, and advertising design. Prerequisite: CA 210.

CA 330: Event Based Video
Remote video coverage of live events for broadcast, cable, web cast, and CD/DVD distribution, with emphasis on live coverage with little or no editing in post production.

CA 335: Communication Arts Seminar
Readings, research, case studies and dialogue with professionals in the media. Prerequisite: CA220 and at least 30 credits in Communication Arts. Course is designed primarily for Communication Arts majors.

CA 340: Social Media Marketing
Examines the life cycle of the social media marketing and communications process—from strategy to implementation to program monitoring and measurement; addresses the applications of social media through hands-on experience, developing skills in the most widely used social platforms. (Also offered as MKTG 340.)

CA 375H: Freud on Broadway
Students will examine the underlying themes and values, literary and psycho-social, in the dramatic discourse of five major American playwrights: Eugene O’Neill, Tennessee Williams, Edward Albee, Lillian Hellman and John Steinbeck. Consideration is given to the basic concepts of Freudian psychoanalytic theory as applied to significant characters in the selected play.
CA 376H: International Communications
Students study the influence of Western Culture and technology on the welfare of developing nations. The course work includes an investigation into the clash of ideologies between East and West and an examination of issues determining the viability of a global theory of communications.

CA 378: International Film
A study of classic and contemporary international films created within different production systems and revealing diverse cultural traditions, values, and experiences of the human condition. (Honors Program students only)

CA 401: Studies in Persuasion
Investigation of ways the media influence personal, economic and political decision-making. Emphasis on how attitudes are formed, changed, and affect one’s thinking. Prerequisite: CA 220.

CA 407: Broadcast Media Programming
Varieties of radio, television, and cable program content: current issues as they relate to network, syndicated, local, public, and cable programming; FCC and legal influences on programming; management practices and use of resources. Prerequisite: CA 220.

CA 410 – 411: Communication Internship I and II (3 credits each)
Opportunity for communication arts majors to concentrate in an area of special interest. Generally, students will be assigned to a field placement involving such communication arts as journalism, film production, television, cable, radio, Theatre, public relations, interactive communications, etc. At least 120 hours at the placement site. Appropriate readings, logs, a research paper, conferences with the Communication Arts internship supervisor. Prerequisites: CA 220, permission of the instructor and completion of 36 credit hours on the Communication Arts major.

CA 413: Theory and Criticism of Media and the Performing Arts
Study of critical responses to contemporary media and the performing arts. Prerequisite: CA 220 and at least second semester junior status.

CA 419: Digital Video Editing
Incorporate pictures, music, and special effects and learn both the concepts and techniques involved with digital video editing.

CA 420: Video Magazine Production
This class will produce topical news and entertainment segments that become part of an ongoing magazine style television show. Prerequisite: CA 221 or previous production experience.

COMPUTER SCIENCE  

CS 101 Introduction to Computer Science and Programming
This course provides an introduction to computer and computational sciences. Students will learn to develop computer programs to simulate, analyze, study and solve phenomena and problems in the natural and social sciences and in business. Students will have the opportunity to create computer based applications to solve problems in their main field of study (major).

CS 150 Computer Science I
This course is a "breadth-first" approach to the guidelines of the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM). Topics include an overview of the fields within computer science, a brief history of computers, computer architecture, algorithm development, and introductory programming in Java. Prerequisite: CS 101 and MATH 101 or equivalent.

CS 230 Gaming
This course provides an introduction to gaming. Specific topics covered include the history of games, game design theory, the game design process and the game production process. This course also covers the basics of actual game creation with various concepts illustrated by building either a 2D or 3D game.
Prerequisite: CS 150 or CIS 101.

CS 250 Computer and Information Science II
This is the second course in the computer science major sequence. The course utilizes the object-oriented design approach to building applications, which emphasizes the creation and utilization of reusable software tools (objects). Specific topics covered include Java’s GUI, arrays, files, applets. Several basic data structures and sorting/searching algorithms are presented. Prerequisite: CS 150.

CS 300 Special Topics
Topics vary with each offering.

CS 350 Data Structures
This course is designed to provide both a theoretical and practical approach to data structures and algorithms. Topics covered include algorithm analysis, lists, stacks, queues, searching and sorting algorithms, trees and graphs. The java programming language is used. Prerequisite: CS 250 and MATH 201.

CS 360 Human Computer Interaction
This course covers a broad range of important topics within Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and the implications for the design of interactive systems. It focuses on the design of interactive systems and human computer interfaces based on a multi-disciplinary approach through a synthesis of computer science, cognitive science and psychology and utilizing analytical and empirical techniques to assess, create and evaluate a user interface. Prerequisite: CS 150.

CS 370 Graphics Programming I
This course provides an introduction to computer graphics. Topics covered include basic graphics programming, 2D / 3D representations, transformations, projections and rendering. The course also provides an introduction to Maya. Prerequisite: CS 350.

CS 371 Graphics Programming II
This course is a continuation of Graphics Programming II. Topics covered will include NURBS, surface shading, texture mapping, rendering, and animation. Prerequisite: CS 370.

CS 380 Networks and System Security
This course is designed to provide both a theoretical and practical approach to networks and security. The theoretical topics include data and packet transmission, the architecture of networks and protocols, security and network applications. The practical components of the course include exercises related to the construction, configuration, and administration of a network using appropriate hardware and software systems. Prerequisite: CS 250.

CS 420 Database Management Systems
This course is designed to provide both a theoretical and practical approach to modern relational databases. The course will have two components. The first will be a discussion of current database theory including structured query languages. The second will be a lab to use a current database application. Prerequisite: CS 250.

CS 425 Image Processing & Visualization
Information visualization is a research area that focuses on the use of visualization techniques to help people understand and analyze data. This course provides detailed knowledge related to information visualization and also an introduction to the basic techniques in image processing. Topics in visualization include optics, visual attention, space perception and motion. Prerequisite: CS 150.

CS 430 Systems Analysis and Design
This course will study business organizations and how they design, develop, and maintain information systems. Topics will include understanding the relationships among a variety of information systems professionals and the tools they use to examine information systems. Students will investigate different methods of analysis including data modeling, network modeling and object modeling. Prerequisite: CS 350.

CS 435 Operating Systems and Embedded Systems Applications
This course provides an introduction to operating systems. Specific topics covered include memory, process, I/O and file management. This course also covers the basics of embedded systems with various concepts illustrated by building robots that can perform simple tasks. Prerequisite: CS 350.

CS 450 Software Engineering
This course is an introduction to the practical problems of specifying, designing, and building large, reliable software systems. This work includes a feasibility study, requirements analysis, object-oriented design, implementation, testing, and delivery to the client. Additional topics covered in lectures include professionalism, project management, and the legal framework for software development. Prerequisite: CS 350.

CS 455 Ethics in a Technological Society
This course discusses the application of ethical concepts in the practice of the computer science and information systems professions. Students will discuss and apply the concepts of cyberethics, cybercrime, security and intellectual property. Prerequisite: CS 250.

CS 485 Web Programming
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of ASP.NET and other Web programming technologies and techniques, to build up the ability to logically plan and develop Web programs, to learn to use object-oriented programming and design, to learn to integrate data with Web applications, and to learn to write, test, and debug web based applications.

CS 490 Senior Project
This course is a required capstone course for all senior computer science majors. Each student will design and complete a major project.

Offered as demand warrants: CS 330 Information Systems Theory and Practice.


COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE  

CIS 101 Introduction to Computer Technology
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of computer and information technology.
We will cover the hardware and software components of a computer information system. In addition, we will learn the basics of word processing, spreadsheet software, presentation software and on demand software.

CIS 111 Visual BASIC Programming
An introduction to programming using the object-oriented language Microsoft Visual Basic. Topics include designing and creating applications using control structures, files, and arrays. The course will include standard algorithms for searching and sorting.

CIS 211 Software Topics
(Also offered as MIS 211) The purpose of this course is to expand the knowledge and expertise of students so they may become more technologically competent. Students will learn how to use software to solve a variety of problems. Topics will include textual design, mathematical design, information design and research design.

CIS 300 Special Topics
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CJ 101: Introduction to Criminal Justice
The interrelated criminal justice components: police, courts, corrections, history, definitions, and important issues and concepts.

CJ 103: Introduction to Courts
The objectives, processes, roles, politics and various philosophical perspectives of the courts, prosecution and defense attorneys.

CJ 105 Introduction to Policing
The development of modern law enforcement, techniques employed by police officers, and current issues in law enforcement.

CJ 200: Special Problems
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering. Sample topics: Intro to Law Enforcement, Intro to Corrections, Intro to Criminalistics, Police Science: Administration, Police Science: Operations Police Role in Crime and Delinquency, Criminal Investigation, The Law of Criminal Evidence.

CJ 201: Criminology
The nature and causation of crime, approaches to the study of crime, its treatment and prevention. The sociology of criminal law, the nature of criminal behavior, theories and research.

CJ 205: Juvenile Delinquency and the Juvenile Justice Process
The philosophy and methods employed by the criminal justice system to provide programs for the control and prevention of juvenile delinquency and youth crime and theories of juvenile delinquency. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

CJ 206: Police Science Administration
Study of managing/organizing at highest level of police organizations. Setting of policy/establishment of purpose and procedures. Police systems, traditional structures, work processes and organization improvement.

CJ 209: Criminal Investigation
Basic overview of the nature of criminal investigation. Investigation as both an art and science. Study of Constitutional guarantees and challenges.

CJ 210: Law of Criminal Evidence
Provides students with basic knowledge of criminal evidence and its use in the criminal justice process. History and development of laws of evidence, judicial notice, statements/confessions, searches/wiretapping, photographic/scientific evidence.

CJ 211: Probation & Parole: Theory & Practice
Administration, organization and management in probation and parole systems. Recruitment, training, assignment and supervision of officers.

CJ 214: Controversial Issues in Policing
Issues of policing currently being debated within the society. Topical focus will change with current political and social climate.

CJ 230: Forensic Psychology
An introduction to forensic psychology as the application of science and profession of the law to issues relating to psychology and the legal system. The role of the forensic psychologist in court proceedings, and the techniques, instruments, and controversies involved in forensic assessment will be covered in this course. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

CJ 300: Special Topics in Criminal Justice
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

CJ 301: Criminal Law
An introduction to criminal law in the United States, including the doctrines and rules used by the courts. Prerequisite: CJ 101 and Junior status.

CJ 303: Law and Society
(Also offered as SOC 303) The nature and purpose of law and the relationship of law to specific social constructions of reality from a variety of theoretical approaches, especially those of Durkheim, Marx, and Weber. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or CJ 101, or permission of the instructor.

CJ 304: Criminal Justice and Community Relations
The role played by the community in police, adjudication and correctional matters. Community control of local police officers, community influence on judicial elections, community response to ex-convicts and community-based corrections.

CJ 305: Crime and the Elderly
Criminal justice issues relevant to the elderly population. Elderly victimization, crime prevention, elderly volunteerism in the CJ system, elderly criminality.

CJ 306: Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
Various criminal justice systems and methods in selected foreign countries. Prerequisite: CJ 101 or CJ 201 or SOC 101.

CJ 307: Civil Law
The history of civil law and the jurisdiction of various civil courts, civil courts demeanor and the penalties associated with civil violations.

CJ 309: The Law and Institutional Treatment
The process of law from arrest to release in its relationship to correctional principles and practices. Functions of the police, defense, prosecution, courts, probation, correction, and parole. Civil rights of the accused and convicted, legal basis of commitment, bail, fines, prisoner rights and writs. Prerequisite: Any one of the following: CJ 201, 205, 302, 304, 306.

CJ 312: Penology
The history, theories and practices of criminal punishment as these relate to the present penal system. Goals and philosophies of punishment, strategies of punishment, effectiveness of punishment, the nature of penal reform, and future directions for punishment in contemporary society." Prerequisites: SOC 101 or CJ 101 or 201.

CJ 314: Psychopathology of Violence
This course is designed to introduce psychopathological disorders, symptoms, and impairments that contribute to violent behavior. Cross-listed with psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

CJ 315: Prisons in America
Critically examines the prison sanction, its problems and solutions in American society. The course explores myths and realities as it covers the prison institution and processes; the experience of incarceration for inmates and staff, including the nature of prison as punishment, prison culture and relationships, problems of violence and control, and special types of inmates as women, elderly, physically and mentally ill offenders; and trends and challenges for contemporary prisons. Prerequisites: SOC 101 or CJ 101.

CJ 319: Terrorism
The nature of terrorism both foreign and domestic. Terrorism as a synthesis of war and theatre. The purposes of terrorism; the creation of mood; political implications.

CJ 350: Criminal Justice Research (1 credit)
This one-credit course, which students may take up to three times, affords upper level criminal justice majors the opportunity to work as a research assistant to a criminal justice faculty member. Research includes helping to facilitate and transcribe discussions from focus groups, conducting and/or transcribing interviews; compiling sampling frames; disseminating questionnaires; collecting and cleaning data; preliminary data analysis; contributing to literature reviews; and other tasks as necessary. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

CJ 401: Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System
The growth of the constitutional relationship between the individual and government at the federal, state, and local levels. Questions relating to search and seizure, interrogation of suspects, public speech, and mass demonstrations. The 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 14th Amendments.

CJ 403: Criminal Justice Problems
Contemporary issues in criminal justice. Prerequisite: CJ 201 or junior status.

CJ 405: Research Methods in Social Science
(Also offered as SOC 405. See SOC 405 for course description.) Junior or senior status, should be taken no later than Fall of senior year.

CJ 410: Criminal Justice Practicum
Supervised field experience in a variety of institutional settings (100 hour placement over course of the semester); research paper under faculty supervision, and weekly course meetings. Prerequisite: Criminal justice major or minor, minimum GPA 2.5 or above, criminal justice GPA 2.5 or above, junior or senior status. Prerequisite/co-requisite: any 400 level class in criminal justice. Must receive permission of instructor before registering for this class, may be taken more than once for substantially different practicum placements with approval of instructor.

ENGLISH

ENG 099: Developmental English
Basic writing skills necessary for work in credit bearing courses. Vocabulary, syntax, paragraph development, critical thinking.

ENG 100: Introduction to College Writing
Introduces the writing and thinking skills necessary to achieve success in a program of regular college study. Areas covered include: critical thinking, syntax, paragraph structure, and the clear and effective composition of college-level essays. At the end of the course, students may receive consideration for exemption from English 101 and placement directly into English 102.

ENG 101: College English
Emphasizes the development of critical and analytical skills and the ability to write clear and effective college-level essays. Prerequisite: placement, ENG 099, or 100.

ENG 102: Intermediate Composition
Emphasizes the forms of writing required of students during their college careers and in their professional lives, with an emphasis on research skills. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or 100 with approval of the Director of the Writing Program.

ENG 175H: English Honors I
Readings and analysis of a number of works of fiction and non-fiction; poetry and drama drawn from great literatures of the world, East and West, ancient and modern. Library research. (Honors Program students only)

ENG 176H: English Honors II
Continuation of ENG 175H. (Honors Program students only)

ENG 201: Writing About British Literature
Refines and enhances the skills of writing developed in English 101 and English 102 using a selection of representative works of important English writers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG 203: Writing About American Literature
Refines and enhances the skills of writing developed in English 101 and English 102 using a selection of representative works of important American writers. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG 205: Writing About World Literature
Refines and enhances the skills of writing developed in English 101 and English 102 using a selection of representative works of important writers from all continents. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG 207: Writing about World Mythology
Refines and enhances the skills of writing developed in English 101 and English 102 by reading a selection of representative myths from a variety of cultures. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG 208: The Craft of Writing
An advanced course in writing expository prose. The role of the writer as an interpreter of experience in the modern world. Contemporary issues, critical thinking and narrative development. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG 209: Introduction to Creative Writing
An introduction to the basic elements of creating poetry, fiction, and non-fiction.

ENG 211: Critical Methods
An introduction to critical thinking about literature. Required of all English majors, for whom this should be the first course after completion of the freshman writing sequence. Prerequisite: ENG 102 and one course from ENG 201, 203, 205, 207 or 221.

ENG 221: Writing About Major Literary Types
The forms and techniques of the major genres of literature: poetry, drama, short fiction and the novel. Representative works in the development of literature. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG 232: Literature for Children
(Also offered as EDEL 232) Children’s literature and authors; literary criticism & awards, illustrations & artists; focus on the multicultural contributions to the genre.

ENG 300: Special Topics
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

ENG 303: Development of Drama I
Classical to mid-19th century.

ENG 304: Development of Drama II
19th century to present.

ENG 305: Shakespeare
Shakespeare’s major plays.

ENG 307: The English Language
The development of the English language. The evolution of the language from Old English and Middle English to its present day form.

ENG 309: Advanced Non-Fiction Workshop
A seminar/workshop for critical evaluation of student creative work in the writing of non-fiction. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG 311: Advanced Poetry Workshop
A seminar/workshop for critical evaluation of individual student creative work in fiction. Assigned readings, individual conferences with instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 102.
ENG 312: Advanced Fiction Workshop
A seminar/workshop for critical evaluation of individual student creative work in poetry. Assigned readings, individual conferences with instructor. Prerequisite: ENG 102.

ENG 313: Chaucer
The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, and other works.

ENG 315: Seventeenth Century Literature
Poetry, prose and drama of the 17th century.

ENG 318: Eighteenth Century Literature
Poetry, prose and drama of the 18th century.
ENG 319: Late Modern Literature
From Modernism to Post-Modernism.

ENG 320: Milton
Milton’s Paradise Lost and other poems.

ENG 325: English Romanticism
The writers who shaped English literary history in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

ENG 326: The Victorian Age
The techniques and leading ideas of the major poets and novelists of the mid-nineteenth century.

ENG 327: Post Colonial Fiction
An examination of fiction as a genre, with examples drawn from colonized cultures in the Western and Non-Western literary traditions.

ENG 342: Irish Writers
Irish Literature from the eighth century A.D. to present.

ENG 345: History of Comedy
Through a variety of textual examples (film, television, literature), this course will study the literary as well as the popular uses of humor and satire, and the development of the genre over time. We will also consider a number of theoretical perspectives (for example, psychological and philosophical) which seek to explain and examine how comedy works.

ENG 346: Literature and Gender
A study of the complex variety of gender issues addressed by both male and female writers.

ENG 351: African-American Writers
Representative works in autobiography, poetry and the novel from the antebellum period to the 20th century.

ENG 375H: Themes in Western Culture
Through the close reading and written analysis of several works of European literature, the course will examine the central question of what it means to be human in Western culture and thought.

ENG 377H: America in Crisis-The Thirties
The course examines representative historical and literary works of and about the Great Depression years in America and the importance of the decade 1929-1939 in American History. Students will evaluate how the major literary works of this decade were a response to certain historical and political events.

ENG 380: The English Novel
The English novel from the eighteenth century to the twentieth century.

ENG 381: The American Novel
The American novel from the eighteenth century to the present.

ENG 382: The Contemporary Novel
The novel in the English-speaking world from 1960 to the present.

ENG 400: Special Studies
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

ENG 401: Modern Poetry
Major British and American Poetry from 1900 to 1950.

ENG 402: Contemporary Poetry
International poetry from 1950 to the present.

ENG 409: Writing Internship
Provides an opportunity for students to develop and enhance written communication skills in a professional setting. Eligible students will have completed at least 75 credit hours of undergraduate coursework with a concentration in English and/or Writing. Internship requires at least 120 field-contact hours and includes scheduled conferences with the professor and a project journal.

ENG 410: Senior Seminar
Critical discussions and research using literary theory, resulting in an undergraduate thesis. Required of all English majors, for whom this should be the capstone course. Prerequisite: ENG 208, ENG 211, and at least three upper-level English courses, or permission of instructor.

ENG 411: Directed Thesis Workshop
The capstone course for the Creative Writing major, this seminar offers a combination of individualized instruction and group work to help students create a creative portfolio of their work.

The following three credit course is not scheduled during the catalog period but may be offered if student demand is sufficient: ENG 352 Vietnam in America/America in Vietnam.

FORENSIC SCIENCE  

FS 101: Introduction to Forensic Science
Forensic science is the study and application of science to the process of law and involves the collection, examination, evaluation, and interpretation of evidence. This course introduces students to the basic principles and uses of forensic science in the American system of justice and examines the basic applications of the biological, physical, chemical and medical sciences to questions of evidence and law. This course is open to non-science majors only. Prerequisite: a basic understanding of high school chemistry and biology.

FS 201: Forensic Science
This course will review the basic applications of the biological, physical, chemical and behavioral sciences to the questions of evidence and law. Students will gain a basic understanding of the capabilities and limitations of forensic sciences as they are practiced. Two lecture hours and two lab hours per week. Prerequisites: Only students accepted into the third year of the forensic science program may enroll in this course.

FS 405: Forensic Biology (4 credits)
This course will review the identification and collection of biological evidence, and essential methods and basic applications of forensic DNA analysis and serology using case studies and laboratory exercises. Three lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Prerequisites: Only students accepted into the third year of the forensic science program may enroll in this course.

FS 407: Instrumental Methods of Analysis & Microscopy (4 credits)
The theory and practice of experimental techniques and instrumental methods in both lecture and laboratory settings will be taught in this class. Research skills such as scientific writing, handling data and the presentation of results will also be stressed. The theory and application of spectrophotometric methods, separation of mixtures by chromatography, spectrometry and microscopy will be presented. Two lecture hours and six lab hours per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 402 and CHEM 301.

FS 410: Summer Internship (6 credits)
The internship must be completed during the summer of their junior year. A minimum of two hundred forty (240) hours must be completed to graduate. Prerequisites: Only students who have completed their junior year in the Forensic Science program are eligible to enroll in an internship.

FS 415: Senior Seminar (1 credit)
This course will consist of guest speakers presenting various areas of forensic science, mock forensic science cases for students to solve utilizing material from previous coursework, exercises in expert testimony in a court of law, topics in forensic science research, and discussion of current cases in the news. Students in the Forensic Science program are required to complete this capstone experience for their degree. Prerequisite: Students must have completed their junior year internship are eligible to enroll in this class.

FRENCH

FR 101: Conversational French I
For students with little or no previous experience in speaking French. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing emphasized.

FR 102: Conversational French II
For students with some previous experience in French. A continuation of the communicative approach of FR 101.

FR 200: Special Studies in French (3 to 6 credits)
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering. Various aspects of language, literature and civilization. To include study abroad and summer immersion programs.

FR 201: Conversational French III
For students who wish to become fluent in the spoken and written language at an intermediate level. Cultural patterns of France and its people.

FR 202: Conversational French IV
Greater proficiency in oral and written expression. Continuation of FR 201.

FR 210: French Communication – Oral & Written I
(Intermediate Level) The study of the French language for oral and written expression.

FR 211: French Communication – Oral & Written II
A continuation of French 210.

FR 300: Special Topics
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering. Sample topics: advanced literary studies, advanced grammatical studies.

The following three credit courses are not scheduled during the catalog period but may be offered if student demand is sufficient: FR 103 French Language & Culture in France & the Americas; FR 111 French for Business I; FR 112 French for Business II; FR 225 Haitian/Creole; FR 301 Society, Literature & Culture in Contemporary France; FR 302 French Literary Masterpieces I; FR 303 French Literary Masterpieces II; FR 306 Seventeenth Century; FR 307 Eighteenth Century; FR 308 Nineteenth Century; FR 310; Advanced French Grammar and Composition; FR 317 Haitian-American Culture in the United States; FR 401 The Modern French Novel; FR 406 Modern French Drama; FR 407 Modern French Poetry; FR 450 Sociolinguistics.

GEOGRAPHY  

GEOG 201: Human Geography
Inter-relations of people and their environment, geographic concepts of the character and arrangement of the major physical-biotic systems and their significance to people in their surroundings and daily existence.

GEOG 202: Political Geography
The changing character of geopolitical patterns and concepts in world politics; the significance of geography in the strategy of national and international affairs and the power aspect as a prerequisite for understanding contemporary problems.

GEOG 300: Special Problems
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

GEOG 301: Economic Geography
The world’s distribution of the earth’s natural and human resources, their economic significance and impact on people, their daily life, economics, politics, and changing interrelationship with them.

GEOG 302: Urban Geography
The demographic, economic, and planning aspects of geography in modern urbanization as a result of ever- increasing population, growth of industry, mass transportation; basic problems of residential, commercial, and industrial complexes in a megalopolitan society in America.

GEOG 320: Monsoon Asia
(Also offered as ECON 320. See ECON 320 for course description.)

GEOG 401: Geography of Latin America
A geographic overview of Latin America including its natural resources, landscape evolution, and economic potentials that relates its past, present and future development to the changing world.

GERONTOLOGY

The following three credit courses are not scheduled during this catalog period but may be offered if student demand is sufficient: GRN 201 Introduction to Gerontology; GRN 210 Pre-Retirement Planning; GRN 215 Cross Cultural Patterns in Aging; GRN 300 Special Topics in Gerontology; GRN 400 Seminar in Gerontology; GRN 404 Coordinating Services for the Elderly; GRN 410 Gerontology Practicum.

HISTORY

HIST 101: History of the United States I
From the colonial period to 1865; emphasis on selected topics to comprehend their historical and contemporary significance on American life and tradition.

HIST 102: History of the United States II
From 1865 to the present; emphasis on selected topics to comprehend both their historical and contemporary significance on American life and culture.

HIST 201: Modern Europe 1500-1848
Examine major political, economic, social, cultural and intellectual developments that affected Europe and the world. Study the transformation of Europe from the Renaissance to the French Revolution. Includes an assessment of industrialization in Europe.

HIST 202: Modern Europe Since 1848
Examine the Industrial Revolution, origins of the two World Wars, rise of totalitarianism, the challenge of Soviet power, and the reconstruction of Europe. Explore Europe’s changing relationship with the world.

HIST 205: Studies in Cultural History
Overview of multi-ethnic cultural history in US. Development of American culture; comparison with/contrast with other American (Western hemisphere) nations.

HIST 300: Special Problems
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering. Prerequisite: may require permission of the instructor depending on content. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200 level course in History.

HIST 301: Problems in American/European/Non-Western History
An in-depth study of selected major problems for America/Europe/Non-West in an age of challenge and change. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102.

HIST 303: Problems In American/European History
An in-depth study of selected major problems for America/Europe in an age of challenge and change; both internally and in its relationship to the contemporary world; primary sources and interpretive material will be evaluated for background and significance. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200 level course in History.

HIST 305: Colonial America
Aspects of intercolonial political, economic, social, and cultural patterns with emphasis on their impact on colonial society in creating an American tradition significant to the present day. Prerequisite: a 300 level course in History.

HIST 306: American Revolution
Examines the American Revolution as a pivotal event in the North American colonies. Topics include colonial life and society, the failure of British imperial and colonial policy, classical liberalism, and the political development of a new nation through 1800. Prerequisite: HIST 101.

HIST 307: The Rise of the American Nation
An examination of the early national period from 1800 through 1848. Themes include the rise of democracy, northern capitalism, slavery, reform movements, and manifest destiny. Prerequisite: HIST101.

HIST 308: History of Sports in the United States
Examines the historical development of sporting practices in the United States from a social and cultural standpoint, particularly through the lenses of race, class, and gender. Prerequisite: HIST 102.

HIST 309: Civil War and Reconstruction
An appraisal of the causes of the war, its progress and aftermath; interpretations of historians as to its inevitability, its political and military leadership, its legacy. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102.

HIST 311: Twentieth Century American Diplomacy
America’s role viewed from the historical perspective as a world power since 1892; the shift from isolationism to internationalism and global responsibility; reappraisal of specific objectives and goals of foreign policy and changes in the conduct of diplomacy to the present day. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200 level course in History.

HIST 314: The 1960s
An examination of the politics, culture, and society of the period with emphasis upon the conflicts over cultural authority and political legitimacy, between the forces of order, consensus, and containment of those of protest, resistance, and liberation. Topics will include the cold war, civil rights, the student movement, the Vietnam War, sexual liberation and the counterculture. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102.

HIST 315: American Women’s History
The course surveys women’s struggles for suffrage and political rights, the conflicts between women of different classes, races, and generations, and the difficulties and opportunities that have accompanied women's attempts to balance work and home life. Prerequisite: one 300-level course in History.

HIST 316: City and Suburb in America
This course examines the evolution of the United States from a rural and small-town society to an urban and suburban nation. Themes to be discussed are the impact of industrialization, immigration and internal migration, the onset of racial and urban problems, the formation of new and distinctive urban subcultures, the problems of health and housing, and corrective public policies from the 19th century to the present. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102.

HIST 320: Age of the Renaissance and Reformation
The intellectual, religious, and institutional developments as they affected these two separate and distinct movements in the emergence of secular culture and religious reform. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200 level course in History.

HIST 324: Immigrants in America
Examine experiences of European and non-European immigrants. Explore reasons and implications of their displacement and adjustment. Examination of immigrant perspectives and current debates about immigration and immigrant experience. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200 level course in History.

HIST 325: Hitler’s Germany
Examine the reasons that led to the rise of Nazism. Examine Facist/Nazi ideology, examine the rise of Hitler, construction of a Total State. Explore how Nazi Germany functioned, and evaluate compliance and resistance against the Nazi regime. Prerequisite: a 100 and a 200 level course in History.

HIST 340: Modern Latin America
An analysis of the background and development of Latin American history, society, and politics, particularly problems relating to stability and change, such as population pressures on existing political, economic, and social institutions, and the contemporary revolution of rising expectations. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200 level course in History.

HIST 343: History of China
Chinese history with emphasis on significant periods in the development of China; special attention to period beginning with the Qing dynasty, Opium War, 1911 revolution, communist state, China’s role in the modern world. Prerequisite: A 100- or 200-level course in History.

HIST 344: Colonial and Post-Colonial History
Examine European colonialism with emphasis on Africa/Asia. Emphasis is on an examination of colonial policies, impact on colonies and emergence of nationalism.

HIST 345: Colonial and Postcolonial Vietnam
From the French colonial experience to the United States’ intervention, this course brings together the histories of colonialism, nationalism, and anti-communism, using Vietnam as a focal point. Prerequisite: HIST 101 or 102 and HIST 201 or 202.

HIST 346: Modern Africa
The complex historical and psychological forces of the past applied to the problems of the emerging nations achieving political stability, economic viability and cultural identity; the future of the continent in world politics. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200 level course in History.

HIST 348: History of Russia
History of the Russian Empire, the Bolshevik revolution and the establishment of a totalitarian regime under the U.S.S.R., the collapse of communism and its consequences. Prerequisite: a 100 or 200 level course in History.

HIST 420: Research Seminar
Research seminar required of history majors with focus on a selected problem area for intensive study. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and three 300 level courses in history.

HUMANITIES  

Courses with the Humanities’ prefix (HUM) are interdisciplinary in nature, and are offered by the Humanities Division at various times. HUM courses may also be accepted for credit in other disciplines with approval of the appropriate Division Chair.

HUM 201: Service In The Community
Offer students a supervised experience in the activities of community organization and voluntary service. Course provides for an expression of civic responsibility while demonstrating how community agencies function in response to human needs.

HUM 302: The Holocaust
Study of diverse representations of the historical forces surrounding the Holocaust, and an opportunity to analyze and discuss selected literary works.


ITALIAN  

ITAL 101: Conversational Italian I
For students with little previous experience in speaking Italian. Listening, speaking, reading and writing emphasized.

ITAL 102: Conversational Italian II
For students with some previous experience in Italian and a continuation of the communicative approach of ITAL101.

ITAL 200: Special Studies in Italian
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering. Various aspects of language, literature and civilization. To include study abroad and summer immersion programs.

ITAL 201: Conversational Italian III
For students who wish to become more fluent in the spoken and written language at the intermediate level. Cultural patterns of Italy and its people.

ITAL 202: Conversational Italian IV
Greater proficiency in oral and written expression. Continuation of ITAL 201.

ITAL 210: Italian Communication - Oral and Written
Development of the more intricate aspects of the Italian language, including the language/dialect distinction, for oral and written expression.

ITAL 211: Communication in Italian
Further development in the use of oral and written Italian, as applied to academic study and to the real world. Appreciation of literature, music, and the fine arts; doing work in an Italian-language environment.

ITAL 300: Special Topics
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering. Various aspects of language, literature and civilization. May include study abroad or summer immersion programs.

MATHEMATICS

MATH 098: Mathematics Workshop I (3CE)
A review of basic numerical and algebraic facts.

MATH 099: Mathematics Workshop II (3CE)
Mathematical skills for students with fewer than two years of high school mathematics preparation or who are otherwise deficient in mathematics. A basic algebra course to prepare students for MATH 101.

MATH 100: General Mathematics
Number systems, algebra (including polynomials, linear and quadratic equations), and analytic geometry. Course is designed for students with fewer than two years of high school mathematics. (Course offered only in the Associate Degree program at the United States Military Academy at West Point.)

MATH 101: College Algebra
Exponents and radicals, quadratic equations, logarithms, and graphing. (May not be used to satisfy requirements for any math or science majors.)

MATH 102: College Algebra and Trigonometry
Exponents and radicals, quadratic equations, logarithms, and introductory trigonometry.

MATH 104: Pre-Calculus Mathematics
Preparation for calculus. Curve tracing; algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their inverses; elements of analytic geometry. (Not open to students who have completed MATH 202.)

MATH 108: Quantitative Methods in Business and Social Studies
Mathematical background for modern business methods. Topics in both theory and application; sets, relations; linear and quadratic functions; equations, inequalities; matrices, determinants, linear programming; fundamental analytical geometry; permutations, combinations, probability.

MATH 109: Applied Calculus
Selected topics in calculus pertinent to the studies of life sciences and managerial and social sciences. Functions, limits, differentiation, integration, methods and applications of the differential and integral calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 108 or MATH 104 or their equivalent.

MATH 120: Statistics
A first course in statistics. Conceptually covers the basics in descriptive and inferential statistics and computational facility with applied statistics; the proper use and interpretation of statistical results. (Not open to business administration, psychology, or special education majors.)

MATH 180: Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers
Designed for students planning to teach in grades K-6. Selective topics using problem solving techniques to explore place value, basic mathematical concepts governing operations with integers, fractions, decimals, percents, as well as the interrelationship between numbers and geometry, patterns and mathematical models. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or above or permission of the instructor.
MATH 201: Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (4 credits)
The real number system; inequalities, absolute value, analytic geometry; functions; limits; derivatives and their applications. Prerequisite: MATH 104 or equivalent.

MATH 202: Calculus with Analytic Geometry II (4 credits)
The definite integral; trigonometric and exponential integration; integration by parts, partial fractions and trigonometric substitutions; applications; improper integrals; vectors. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in MATH 201.

MATH 203: History of Mathematics
Selected topics from antiquity to present times. Contributions of different cultures to the field of mathematics will be discussed. Prerequisite MATH 104 or equivalent.
MATH 300: Special Topics
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

MATH 301: Calculus with Analytic Geometry III (4 credits)
Sequence, Taylor’s series, infinite series; partial differentiation; cylindrical and spherical coordinates; multiple integration and applications, vector algebra, gradients. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in MATH 202.

MATH 302: Linear Algebra
Linear equations and matrices, vector spaces, subspaces, linear independence, bases, dimension, determinants, linear transformations, eigenvectors, and diagonalization and orthogonality. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in MATH 202.

MATH 303: Differential Equations
First and second order; equations, techniques for solution and application, series solution; Laplace transforms. Prerequisite: MATH 301.

MATH 304: Probability and Mathematical Statistics
Combinatorics; probability models, conditional probability and independence; discrete and continuous random variables; distribution functions and densities; moments; characteristic and moment generating functions; limit theorems. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in MATH 202.

MATH 305: Probability and Mathematical Statistics
The Gamma function; commonly used distributions and densities, point estimation, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: MATH 304.
MATH 306: Vector Analysis and Partial Differential Equations
Line intervals, vector calculus, Fourier series, Fourier transforms, Laplace
transforms, partial differential equations and applications in engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 303.

MATH 308: Discrete Mathematics (4 credits)
Logic, sets, Boolean Algebra, switching circuits, functions, computer arithmetic, methods of proof and mathematical induction. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in MATH 201 or MATH 109.

MATH 309: Discrete Math II (4 credits)
This course will cover order of complexity, recursion, recurrence relations, graph theory, probability, statistics, and matrices. Emphasis is placed on providing a context for the application of mathematics within computer science. Prerequisite: MATH 308 (This course may not be used to satisfy a mathematics requirement for mathematics majors.)

MATH 350: Mathematics of Finance
Compound interest, accumulated values; nominal and effective interest rates; annuities; present values; amortization; bonds. Prerequisite: MATH 108 or equivalent.

MATH 351: Life Contingencies
Probability, mortality tables, single life functions; net; premiums for life annuities and insurance benefits; reserves. Prerequisite: MATH 350.

MATH 36:1 Numerical Analysis
Computer arithmetic, solutions of non-linear equations; solving systems of linear equations, splines; numerical differentiation and integration; numerical solution of differential equations Prerequisites: MATH 301 and 302, one programming language or the consent of the instructor.

MATH 381: Operations Research
(Also offered as BUSA 381. See BUSA 381 for course description.)

MATH 390: Modern Algebra
Groups, subgroups, permutations, cyclic groups, isomorphisms, homomorphisms, rings, integral domains, fields. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in MATH 201.

MATH 401: Theory of Numbers
Divisibility; distribution of primes; congruencies; number-theoretic functions; primitive roots and indices; quadratic reciprocity; sums of squares. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in MATH 202.

MATH 402: Geometry
Selected topics from Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries. Further topics in higher geometry as time permits. Prerequisite: MATH 308 or by permission of the instructor.

MATH 405: Real Analysis
The real number system; sequences; limits and continuity; differential calculus; Riemann integrals; infinite series; sequence of functions. Prerequisite: MATH 301.

MATH 407: Complex Analysis
Complex numbers; functions of a complex variable; limits and continuity; analytic functions; complex integration; sequences and series; residue theory; conformal mappings. Prerequisite: MATH 301.

MUSIC  

MUS 101: Introduction to Music
This course emphasizes listening for the purpose of understanding a wide range of musical styles and cultures, ranging from ancient traditions to the present. The course examines music of numerous time periods both for its intrinsic value as well as how it relates to culture, historical context, function with society, and political importance. Music is viewed as a universal phenomenon that is common to all cultures.

MUS 150/151: Choral Singing (1 credit)
Entails the practical application of choral singing techniques including voice production, basic music theory, sight- singing, ensemble performance and stage deportment. The enjoyment of singing will be emphasized as well as choral singing as a life-long endeavor. Repertoire includes classical music from the choral literature as well as arrangements of popular vocal music. This course may be repeated for credit.

MUS 204: Music Fundamentals
Music Fundamentals focuses on the basic rudiments of music, including rhythm, pitch, harmony and other elements. It is devoted to the facilitation of learning these fundamentals through hands-on practice including improvisation, group assignments, reading and writing music notation and listening analysis.

MUS 210: Basics of Singing
A practical introduction to singing based on a hands-on, workshop model. The course focuses on vocal technique, anatomy and physiology of the voice, how to practice, stage deportment and a historical overview of singing styles throughout history.

MUS 220: Guitar Performance
Guitar class is appropriate for complete beginners with no experience in music as well as intermediate players who would like to sharpen their skills. The course provides students with the opportunity to learn fundamental guitar performance technique as well as the historical and cultural development of the guitar as an instrument.

MUS 300: Special Topics
These are selected specialized topics that may include: World Music, Music of South America, Afro-Pop Music, Music Technology and other courses that reflect contemporary topics in music making and consumption.
MUS 206: Introduction to American Music
The course emphasizes listening for the purpose of deeper understanding of our American musical landscape in all of its variety. Additionally, it focuses on ways in which music has accompanied and influenced our collective development as a nation. American music as it relates to global influences, different cultures, politics, functionality, and intrinsic enjoyment are examined.

MUS 205: Introduction to Jazz
This course is an exploration of the historical, cultural, political, and musical origins of jazz. Jazz is one of the only uniquely American musical art forms and relates directly to our development as a nation after the Civil War years. The Development of Jazz explores the many faceted history of jazz and its relationship to culture, race relations and political influences. The course also explores jazz and its standing as an international phenomenon.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy
Fundamental issues in philosophy.

PHIL 102: Logic and Critical Thinking
Methods for distinguishing good from bad reasoning.

PHIL 200: Special Problems
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering. Prerequisite: One philosophy course at 100 level or permission of instructor.

PHIL 203: Philosophy of the Human Person
Development of themes concerning the nature of man such as determinism and materialism. Prerequisite: One philosophy course at 100 level or permission of instructor.

PHIL 206: Ancient and Medieval Philosophy
The development of philosophic thought from its origins in Greece to the end of the Middle Ages.

PHIL 207 Philosophy of the Modern Era
This course traces the main developments in philosophic thought from the 17th to the mid-19th century.

PHIL 209 History of Ethics
A chronological exploration of major ethical theories in Western thought, beginning with the Greeks and moving through contemporary thought. Competing visions of ideal social justice will be examined, from theologically motivated worldviews, through utilitarianism, Marxism, and Rawlsian liberalism.

PHIL 303: Philosophy of Religion
(Also offered as RELS 301) Development of the philosophical issues raised by religious belief such as the existence of God, the problem of evil, and the nature of faith. Prerequisite: One philosophy course at 100 level or permission of instructor.

PHIL 304 Political Philosophy
Our political institutions and practices are the result of our thinking over several millennia about the type of political organization which has the best justification given our competing interests, differing values, and foundational moral principles. This course is intended to give an historical understanding of the developing intellectual process that has resulted in the debates we are still having concerning our political institutions and practices.

PHIL 310: Philosophy of Knowing and Being
A study of the nature and scope of knowledge and of the nature of reality. Prerequisite: One philosophy course at 100 level or permission of instructor.

PHIL 375: Ethical Choices for the 21st Century
The application of ethical theory and critical analysis in the establishment of well-reasoned personal positions on timely issues. Among the topics to be considered are abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, justice, sexual morality, reverse discrimination and animal rights. (Honors Program students only)

PHIL 376: Ethical Issues in the World Economy
(Also offered as BUSA 376 and ECON 376) Ethical implications of the global economy. The philosophical basis for contemporary ethical theories and the application of ethical theories to moral decisions made in world economics. Ethical analysis of specific practices and cases in international business and industry and related governmental policies. (Honors Program students only)

PHIL 402: Contemporary Philosophy
Development of major themes in the late 19th and 20th century philosophy such as pragmatism and the role of linguistic analysis. Prerequisite: One philosophy course at 100 level or permission of instructor.

The following three credit courses are not scheduled during this catalog period but may be offered if student demand is sufficient: PHIL 315 Bioethics; PHIL 308 Scholasticism; PHIL 401 Existentialism.

PHYSICS

PHY 201: General Physics I
Primarily for students in mathematics and the natural sciences. Fundamentals of motion, force, linear momentum, work, power, energy , gravitation, mechanics of rigid bodies, rotation, angular momentum, wave motion. Three lecture hours and one recitation hour per week. Corequisite: PHY 211. Prerequisite: MATH 104 or equivalent.
PHY 202: General Physics II
The fundamentals of sound, fluid mechanics, electrostatics, electricity, electrical circuits, magnetism, optics, and optical instruments. Three lecture hours and one recitation hour per week. Corequisite: PHY 212. Pre-requisite: “C” grade or better in Physics 201. Prerequisite: MATH 104 or equivalent.

PHY 211: General Physics Lab I (1 credit)
Laboratory experiments which parallel topics in Physics 201. Two laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: PHY 201.

PHY 212: General Physics Lab II (1 credit)
Laboratory experiments which parallel topics in Physics 202. Two laboratory hours per week. Corequisite: PHY 202.

PHY 300: Special Topics
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

PHY 302: Atomic and Nuclear Physics
Introduction to relativity, atomic physics, discharge tube experiments; atomic models of Thompson, Rutherford, Bohr, photoelectric effect; black-body radiation; quantum theory; matter waves, and wave mechanics; properties of the nucleus and nuclear reactions. Prerequisites: “C” grade or better in MATH 201, 202 and PHY 201-202.

PHY 303: Statics
First half of a one-year sequence. Concepts of statics, including force systems, equilibrium conditions, simple structures, distributed forces. Shear and moments, friction and the concept of work, virtual work and stability. Prerequisite or concurrent registration: “C” grade or better in MATH 202, PHY 202.

PHY 304: Dynamics
Second half of a on-year sequence. Concepts of dynamics, including kinematics of particles, velocity and acceleration. Newton’s Laws of motion, momentum, work, kinetic energy, potential energy, central force fields, vibrations, resonance, dynamics of systems of particles, kinematics of a rigid body, dynamics of a rigid body. Prerequisite: PHY 303.

PHY 305: Materials Science
(Also offered as CHEM 305) Electron structure of atoms; atomic and molecular bonding; energy bands; crystal structure; imperfections; noncrystalline solids; reaction rates; diffusion; transport phenomena - thermal conductivity, electrical conduction; metals, insulators, semi-conductors; magnetism. Prerequisite: “C” grade or better in PHY 201- 202, CHEM 201-202.

PHY 306: Electricity and Magnetism (4 credits)
Introductory aspects of electromagnetic theory. Static electric fields, Coulomb’s Law, Gauss’ Law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, electric current and resistance, Ampere’s Law, Faraday’s Law, Maxwell’s equations in integral form, electromagnetic waves. Three lecture hours and two lab hours per week. Prerequisites: “C” grade or better in PHY 202 and MATH 202.

PHY 307: Mechanics of Solids
The physical principles describing the behavior of solids under stress. Topics include stress, strain, torsion, bending, transverse loading, transformations of stress and strain, beam and shaft design, beam deflection, energy methods, and column design. Prerequisite: PHY 303.

PHY 308: Linear Networks
Basic linear electrical circuits, theories and concepts. Signals and waveforms, network concepts, Kirchhoff’s laws, energy and power, phasors and steady-state analysis, resonance, filters. Prerequisites: “C” grade or better in MATH 202 and PHY 202.

PHY 309: Biophysics
(Also offered as BIO 309) The applications of the laws of physics to principles and problems of the life sciences. The physics of living systems in statics, mechanics, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, sound, electricity, and atomic physics. Lecture course. Prerequisites: “C” grade or better in PHY 201 and 202.

PHY 400: Independent Study (1 - 3 credits)
Qualified students may, under the supervision of a faculty member, pursue independent study and/or research on selected topics of special interest to the student and the faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of Division Chair.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 201: Contemporary American Politics
Basic principles of the Constitution and how it governs American political life. The structure, organization, powers and functions of our national government and their impact both socially and economically on our established institutions.

POLS 202: American Society and Politics
The role of political parties, pressure groups, public opinion, in our political process and contemporary society as they affect stability and change in our democratic society.

POLS 203: American Presidency
The presidency with its present unparalleled significance. The role of the office in both domestic and world affairs. The evolution of American presidency from the ratification of the Constitution to the present. The individuals who have held the position.

POLS 204: The American Congress
The function of the Congress under the Constitution and the expanding legislative and non-legislative powers in response to a changing age; the role and responsibility of Congress to adjust to the political, economic, and sociological changes in American society and international relations.

POLS 211: Contemporary European Politics
The political, social and economic forces at work within the western European community since 1945; the redevelopment of western Europe since the war (1945) and the response to the Soviet threat. The European response to the breakup of the Soviet Union and its control of Eastern Europe.

POLS 300: Special Problems
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

POLS 301: Comparative Government
Critical study of the political process and institutions of major powers, including Great Britain, the Commonwealth of Independent States (formerly the Soviet Union), Germany, France and Japan; their interrelationship and relationship to the United States; basic problems confronting each country internally and externally.

POLS 302: Urban Politics
The nation’s urban areas and various reorganizational plans in the political process to meet the needs of the contemporary technological society; their relationship to critical issues such as poverty, welfare, education, and urban renewal.

POLS 312: The Politics of Modern Ireland
Nineteenth and twentieth century Ireland; the development of its political institutions, political parties, leadership and events leading up to partition in 1921, and the sequence of events until the present day.

POLS 332: Environment and the Law
(Also offered as BUSA 332) Introduction to environmental laws and regulations, their applicability and enforcement, with the objective of increasing awareness of environmental problems and their application in decision making, utilizing ethical, legal and business factors.

POLS 350: Constitutional Law
The origin, growth, and contemporary role of the Supreme Court, the evolution of constitutional interpretation and the contests over civil rights and liberties in our society today.

POLS 401: American Political Thought
Selected problems of political theories which have shaped the American nation in the representative writings of American political thinkers; their role in formulating the roots of contemporary political thought.

POLS 402: International Politics
International political behavior and patterns of conflict in international relations of the major world powers; the challenge to long-accepted methods of international law implicit in international communism; the evolving conflict of national sovereignty vs. supra-national concept.

POLS 410: Pre-Law or Government Service Practicum (3 or 6 credits)
Supervised field experience in a variety of law or government service settings. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PSYCHOLOGY  

PSYC 103: General Psychology
Principles and practices of contemporary psychology. Learning, intelligence, motivation, emotion development and personality and social psychology.

PSYC 201: Psychology of Adjustment
The concepts and principles of personal and social adjustment. Factors contributing to the varieties of normal and abnormal adjustment patterns.

PSYC 205: Behavior Modification
Theory and principles of behavior modification techniques and methods employed in the classroom, institutional and residential settings. Practical application included. Critical examination of research. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

PSYC 206: Child Psychology
Major concepts and theories about childhood as a life stage of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth and development; issues and problem areas of childhood.

PSYC 207: Introduction to Health Psychology
Application and contribution of psychological knowledge to problems of health and health care. The significance of psychological factors in the etiology, course and treatment of disease. The role of modern psychology in the prevention of disease and the maintenance and promotion of healthy behavior.

PSYC 208: Adolescent Psychology
Major concepts and theories about adolescence as a life stage of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth and development; adolescent relationships with family, peers, and society; issues and problem areas of adolescence.

PSYC 214: Sports Psychology
(Also offered as SPM 214. See SPM 214 for course description.)

PSYC 215: Industrial and Organizational Psychology
(Also offered as BUSA 215) The principles, theories and concepts of human resource management. The processes and interventions at the individual, group and organizational levels that facilitate employee growth, productivity and development. Prerequisites: PSYC 103.

PSYC 218: Introduction to Alcoholism and Substance Abuse
Basic alcoholism/substance abuse information, gender/race/class issues in addiction, current research findings, prevention programs, education, intervention, evaluation and treatment issues, treatment approaches in individual group and family counseling.

PSYC 220: Human Relations
This is a student-centered course which will explore individual values as well as the values of society. Self- knowledge, sensitivity, and communication skills will be identified and developed. Students will explore the writings of humanistic psychology. Class participation and student interaction will be stressed greatly during this course.

PSYC 222: Introduction to Eating Disorders
History symptomology and treatment of eating disorders and related areas. The biological, psychoanalytic, behavioral and other theoretical perspectives.

PSYC 300: Special Topics in Psychology
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

PSYC 301: Abnormal Psychology
Etiology, symptoms, and treatment of major categories of psychopathology. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

PSYC 302: Social Psychology
(Also offered as SOC 302) This is an upper-division course covering several topics in Social Psychology, including self-perception and the perception of others, attitudes and attitude change, group dynamics, attraction, prejudice, leadership, aggressive behavior, social influences, conformity, gender differences, and health psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 103 or SOC 201.

PSYC 306: Personality Theory
Major approaches to personality development. Psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, behavioral, trait and humanistic approaches. Various therapeutic methods. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

PSYC 307: Psychological Testing and Assessment
Principles of psychological and educational testing; use of standardized tests in evaluating individuals and groups; survey of tests of intelligence, achievement, personality and interest. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

PSYC 310: Statistical Methods in Psychology
Fundamental statistical procedures and their application to the analysis and interpretation of psychological and educational data. Topics include measures of central tendency and variability, correlation, normal and t-distributions, chi square and simple analysis of variance. Prerequisite: PSYC 103 and MATH 101; junior or senior standing.

PSYC 311: Psychology of Women
Women and male/female differences from both a biological and psychological perspective; gender roles, male/female relationships, and problems confronting women in today’s society. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

PSYC 313: Group Dynamics
The principles, theory and concepts of group behavior as provided by the study of major theorists. The dynamics of group psychotherapy. Practical application of group principles. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

PSYC 315: Child Psychopathology
Etiology, symptoms and treatment of major forms of psychopathology in childhood and early adolescence including behavior disorders, emotional and mood disorders, developmental disorders, eating disorders and problems resulting from child abuse and neglect. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

PSYC 316: Adult Development
Adulthood, defined as beginning at age 21. Developmental stages of adulthood, maturity characeteristics, identity, interpersonal relationships, and social and professional changes through the adult years; physical and emotional aspects of aging; death and dying. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

PSYC 318: The Psychology of Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Addictive disorders involving drugs and alcohol. The interrelationship between biological and psychological issues in the development of and recovery from addiction. Prerequisite: PSYC 103. Recommended : PSYC 218.

PSYC 325: Positive Psychology
In Positive Psychology, the focus is on building personal strengths and resilience, instead of dwelling on pathology. The specific characteristics of people with positive outlooks will be identified, along with strategies for cultivating and experiencing authentic happiness and other positive emotional states. This course will examine the theoretical basis behind the positive psychology movement, the extensive research in support of the model, and the many applications of positive psychology to everyday life. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

PSYC 334: Counseling Techniques
The principles and methods of counseling. The value of various approaches and processes. Application of techniques in the treatment of a variety of disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 103.

PSYC 401: Human Resource Management
(Also offered as BUSA 401. See BUSA 401 for course description.)

PSYC 407: Physiological Psychology
Fundamental concepts of human physiology with emphasis on the interrelationship between physiological processes and human behavior. Emotional, psychopathological, and the more complex human functions. Prerequisite: PSYC 103 and 310, and three psychology courses at the 300/400 level.

PSYC 408: Deviant Behavior
(Also offered as SOC 408) Alcoholism, drug abuse, sexual deviancy and antisocial behavior. Etiology, personality characteristics, methods of rehabilitation, social issues. Prerequisite: PSYC 103 or SOC 201.

PSYC 409: Experimental Psychology
Design and evaluation of selected experiments in such areas as learning, thinking, motivation, and social behavior. Prerequisites: PSYC 103 and 310, and three psychology courses at the 300/400 level.

PSYC 410: Psychology Practicum
A senior level course involving supervised experience in mental health agencies, institutions, community residencies, research institutes, rehabilitation centers, special educational settings, and psychiatric centers. Research paper under supervision of Practicum Faculty. Prerequisites: Application to Division Chair will require overall GPA of 2.50 or better, Psychology GPA of 2.75 or better, minimum C+ in PSYC 310 and PSYC 409, recommendations from two full- time psychology Faculty. Register in Fall or Spring to insure adequate time for completion. May not be offered during winter or summer sessions.

PSYC 411: Internship: Alcohol/Substance Abuse (6 credits)
A six-credit course for senior level students completing the specialization in Alcohol/Substance Abuse coursework within the major in Psychology. Placement in a field location specializing in the treatment of alcohol/substance abuse disorders. Research papers (2) under supervision of Internship Faculty. Prerequisites: Application to Division Chair will require overall GPA of 2.50 or better, Psychology GPA of 2.75 or better, minimum C+ in PSYC 310 and PSYC 409, recommendations from two full-time psychology Faculty. Register in Fall semester to insure adequate time for completion. Will not be offered during winter or summer sessions.


RELIGIOUS STUDIES

RELS 102 Religion and Society
Societies and social structures are never set up in ways that serve the interests of all members equally. This course uses the theories of Bruce Lincoln and Pierre Bourdieu to reflect on how religious traditions are utilized in the maintenance of relationships of domination in society.

RELS 103 Hebrew Scriptures
An overview of the books of the Hebrew Bible with attention paid to the history and tradition of the Hebrew people. Within this overview, particular weight is placed on the prophetic tradition which plays a central role in shaping Judeo-Christian views on social justice.

RELS 104 New Testament
This course considers the content of the New Testament in relationship to the social context in which it was created, focusing in part on how the figures in the text may have challenged or reinforced gender and economic domination. The last part of the course considers the ethics of using sacred texts in modern contexts.

RELS 200: Special Problems
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

RELS 201: Early and Medieval Christian Thought
Development of the central concepts of Christianity from the apostolic era to the end of the medieval period.

RELS 202: Christian Thought in the Modern Era
Development of the central concepts of Christianity in the modern era from the renaissance and reformation to the twentieth century.

RELS 204: Jews and Judaism: A History
A history of Jews and Jewish civilization from Biblical times to the present. Both primary and secondary source material will be analyzed using various tools of historical interpretation.

RELS 208: Contemporary Jewish Beliefs and Practice
A study of the beliefs and practices of Judaism today. What Jews believe and how they put their beliefs into practice will be emphasized. The life cycle, holiday cycle, and ethical teachings, and the importance of the Holocaust and Israel in modern Jewish life and thought will be highlighted.

RELS 209: American Judaism Today
The story of the Jews in America, their history and beliefs. Where the American Jewish community finds itself at the end of the twentieth century will be discussed. The interweaving of history, sociology, economics, politics, and theology will be explored.

RELS 212 Religion in America
The course traces the development of the various religious groups in America and their impact on American political, cultural, and social history.

RELS 213 Religion, Race, and Social Justice
An examination of the role religion has played in both fostering and challenging racial prejudice in the United States. This course examines the special role race relations have had in American culture and highlights the quest for racial equality as perhaps the longest lasting struggle for social justice in American history.

RELS 214 Theology and Social Justice
An exploration of a central American theological movement. At the core of Social Gospel theology was a concern for economic justice and a critique of certain prevailing American values. The course examines key figures of the movement as well as its continuing theological legacy in the Civil Rights movement and liberation theology.

RELS 215 Critical Methods in Social Justice: Religion and Capitalism
This course focuses on the relationship between economic exploitation, social order, and religion in the work of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, as well as contemporary theorists working in their wake.

RELS 216 Fundamentalism
The course presents a history of conservative Christian movements in America. Special attention is paid to the fundamentalist worldview and its vision of social justice. While this vision runs counter to the dominant liberal narrative, fundamentalists nevertheless have a clear vision of the place of humans in creation and their responsibilities for creation.

RELS 220 Religions of the West
Focusing on Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, this course focuses both on the “foundational” texts of these traditions and on how they have been used in modern contexts—to support feminism, to support communism, to support terrorism, etc. The central concern for the course is religious authority and its social functions.

RELS 221 Religions of the East
Focusing on Hinduism and Buddhism, part of this course considers how the elements of these traditions have been co-opted by modern agendas in ways that cohere with late capitalism and other forms of economic exploitation.

RELS 300: Contemporary Religious Issues in America
This course explores the creative forces that have shaped American religion and examines the challenges that confront the religious community today.

RELS 301: Philosophy of Religion
(Also offered as PHIL 303. See PHIL 303 for course description.)

RELS 309 Religion, Gender, and Social Justice
This course first focuses on the social construction of gender, considering the theories of scholars such as Judith Butler and Anne Fausto-Sterling; second, the course considers how gender is constructed in American evangelical Christianity, how those constructions are legitimated within the communities, whose interests are served, and the similarity between those communities and mainstream America.

RELS 312 Evolution of Jesus
This course focuses on how the image of Jesus has evolved since the 1st century, both within Christianity and outside Christianity. A special emphasis is placed on how the images of Jesus changed after the rise of capitalism and how Jesus is used both to justify capitalism and communism.

RELS 401: Christian Ethics in Contemporary Society
The meaning of Christian ethics with special reference to contemporary problems. Prerequisite: RELS 101 or permission of the instructor.

RELS 408: Contemporary Christian Theology
The doctrines of the Christian creed in the perspective of contemporary theology. Prerequisite: RELS 101 or permission of the instructor.

RELS 410: Senior Seminar
This course focuses on 20th century social theorists centrally concerned with the relationship between power, discourse, and social order.

SCIENCE

SCI 101: The Development of Physical Science
For the non-science major. The historical development of physics and astronomy from the ancient Greeks and Babylonians through the present century. Offered occasionally.

SCI 102: Chemistry in Our World
A non-scientist’s understanding of chemists, their work, and how chemistry affects the whole of society.

SCI 120: Exploring Physical Science
Students discover for themselves some basic principles of physics through hands –on experiments in the classroom. For the non-science major but especially suited for future elementary school teachers.

SCI 121: Exploring Biology and Earth Science
An activities-based introduction to biology and earth science. The biology content includes the asis of life and biological principles including the scientific method, principles related to diversity and classification, characteristics of the five kingdoms and three domains, reproduction and life cycles of various organisms, genetics, biotechnology, and major ecological concepts. The earth science content will focus on an introduction to astronomy, basic atmospheric and weather phenomena, properties of rocks and minerals, and changes in the earth including formation and natural disasters. For non-science majors only. Three lecture hours per week.

SCI 200: Special Topics
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

SCI 376H: Science, Technology and Cultural Development
Great ideas from the beginning of science and invention to the cutting edge of contemporary theoretical thought in biology, chemistry and physics. Past and present scientific discoveries and the mutual interaction of scientific and cultural evolutions. (Honors Program students only)

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 101: Introductory Sociology
The fundamental concepts of the discipline, its scientific method, and its application to human behavior. Change in the individual’s relationship to society including social role and interaction, social stratification, group and power relations, and relations between institutions.

SOC 202: Sociology of Family Life
Family life in America from a comparative and historical perspective. The variations in different societies. The family as a social institution, changing attitudes, values and external social conditions, new perspectives on such problems as courtship, marriage, parenthood, conflict of values in family planning and the single parent family.

SOC 203: Ethnic Groups in American Society
The role and influence of major racial and ethnic groups in American life and thought; emphasis on contemporary problems of conflict, adjustment and social change affecting American society.

SOC 300: Special Topics in Sociology
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering.

SOC 302: Social Psychology
(Also offered as PSYC 302. See PSYC 302 for course description.)

SOC 303: Law and Society
(Also offered as CJ 303. See CJ 303 for course description.)

SOC 304: Social Work In Today’s World
Social work as a profession today. Social work, its history, nature and scope; family casework, psychiatric social work, children’s services, court and medical social work, social work in correctional settings, public assistance, social group work, community organization. Field visits to social agencies.

SOC 305: Sociology of Propaganda
Is propaganda the chief mode of discourse in contemporary mass media and in the communications issued by our major social institutions, both public and private, for-profit and nonprofit? This course explores the ways in which political and commercial organizations and policy makes use propaganda to achieve social dominance and visibility at the expense of describing reality. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC 306: Sociology of Emotions
How are emotions shaped by social conditions? This course explores how people’s emotional lives are largely the result of their formative experiences in institutions and are molded by the way society prohibits some emotional expressions while encouraging others. Rather than universal experiences, emotions are viewed in this course as contingent and malleable. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC 307: Work and Organizations
How are our experiences of work different today from those of people living in early or pre-industrialized societies? This course explores the ways in which modern bureaucratic institutions shape the individual’s social psychology and how one can locate meaningful work in contemporary society. Prerequisite: SOC 101.

SOC 405: Research Methods in Social Science
(Also offered as CJ 405) Research techniques, research designs, data collection procedures and causal inference. Prerequisite: junior or senior status. Should be taken no later than fall of senior year.

SOC 408: Deviant Behavior
(Also offered as PSYC 408. See PSYC 408 for course description.)

** These credits may not be considered part of the 120 degree credits.

SPANISH  

SPAN 101: Conversational Spanish I
This introductory course in Spanish emphasizes oral and written communication. We stress all aspects of language learning: Students learn recognition through listening and reading exercises, and self-expression by means of speaking and writing. Spanish 101 is the first half of a year-long course. This is a fast-paced, active class in which each and every student must participate.

SPAN 102: Conversational Spanish II
This is a continuation of the introductory course Spanish 101. It emphasizes oral and written communication and stresses all four language skills. Students learn recognition through listening and reading exercises, and self- expression through speaking and writing. As before, the second half of the introductory sequence is a fast-paced, active class in which all members of the group are expected to participate.

SPAN 200: Special Studies in Spanish (3 to 6 credits)
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering. Various aspects of language, literature and civilization. To include study abroad and summer immersion programs.

SPAN 201: Conversational Spanish III
This is an intermediate level Spanish class, a third semester in the normal college-level sequence. It is intended to fill the needs of those students who have successfully completed the equivalent of a first-year college course or two years of high school Spanish and help them to develop their communicative ability while reviewing and expanding basic structures and vocabulary. As linguistic skills are reinforced , so is cultural awareness. The course is the first half of a year-long sequence.

SPAN 202: Conversational Spanish IV
This is the second part of the intermediate level Spanish class, a fourth semester in the normal college-level sequence. It is intended to fill the needs of those students who have successfully completed the equivalent of a year and a half of Spanish, and help them to develop further their oral and written communicative ability as we review and expand grammatical patterns and vocabulary. Cultural knowledge and awareness are reinforced by means of exposure to the art, history, and geography of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN 210: Spanish Communication - Oral & Written (Intermediate Level)
The study of the Spanish language for oral and written expression. Required of all majors.

SPAN 211: Spanish Communication II
A continuation of SPAN 210 with an introduction to representative short literary works.

SPAN 300: Special Topics (3 to 6 credits)
Offered occasionally. Topics vary with each offering. This course may include: upper level courses, study abroad, or summer immersion programs.

The following 300 and 400 level Spanish courses are conducted in Spanish:

SPAN 302: Highlights of Spanish Literature I
A study of selected major works of Spanish literature, in various genres, from the earliest significant literary manifestations up to and including masterpieces of the Golden Age. The course will provide textual analysis, interpretation, and an overview of Spain’s cultural, political, and social history as a background against which these works were created. All work is done in Spanish.

SPAN 303: Highlights of Spanish Literature II
A study of selected major works of Spanish literature, in various genres, with a concentration on the period following the Golden Age to the present (18th to 20th centuries). The course will provide textual analysis, interpretation, and an overview of Spain’s cultural, political, and social history as a background against which these works were created. All work is done in Spanish.

SPAN 305: Contemporary Spanish Drama
A study of selected dramatic works created in the interval between the flowering of the Generation of ’98 and our own time, with emphasis on the evolution of Spanish theatrical traditions, and the innovations in subject matter, language and technique of individual playwrights.

SPAN 306: Great Spanish Poets
A study of selected masterpieces of Spanish poetry, with attention to the development of various forms from the earliest epic and lyrical examples, through the Renaissance and the best Romantic poetry. Emphasis is placed on the development of modern poetry from the end of the nineteenth century to our time.

SPAN 307: Nineteenth Century Realism
The poetry, novel, and theatre of the Spanish romantic, “costumbrista” and “realista” literature of the 19th century studied.

SPAN 312: Masterpieces of Spanish American Literature
Selected poetry, essays, and short stories from leading Spanish American authors, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries.

SPAN 313: The Short Story in Spanish America
Nineteenth and twentieth century Spanish American culture and ideals as seen through the short story.

SPAN 314: The Contemporary Spanish Novel
A study and interpretation of the Spanish novel since the Civil War through close reading of representative works. Analysis of the novels’ socioeconomic and historical-philosophical contexts and the interplay between those contexts and the evolution of the genre itself.

SPAN 316: The Cultural Heritage of Spanish America
An analysis of the cultural and linguistic characteristics of Latin America. Outstanding literary figures will also be discussed.

SPAN 317: Hispanic Cultures in the United States
An analysis of the cultural and social aspects of Hispanic life in the United States, stressing its historical and cultural roots, its language and its own patterns of belief and behavior.

SPAN 319: The Novel in Spanish America
A close study of the major novels by writers from Spanish America, with an emphasis on contemporary masterpieces that have greatly influenced the novel in English: e.g., works by Cortazar, Fuentes, Garcia Marquez, and Isabel Allende.

SPAN 320: Spanish Thought Through the Ages
A study of selections from major works of Spanish literature, in various genres, but with a concentration on the essay and the narrative. The course will provide analysis and interpretation of texts, and an overview of Spain’s philosophical, political, and social history as a background against which these works were created and to which their authors responded. All work is done in Spanish.

SPAN 345: The Cultural Heritage of Spain
The historical and geographical background of Spain, the diverse peoples who influenced the language, literature and customs of the country.

SPAN 401: Drama of the Golden Age
The study of the Comedia, an outstanding body of dramatic works produced during the Golden Age of Spanish literature and a unique contribution to the development of Western drama. This course offers an exploration of the historical and social framework that was both reflected in and influenced by this vital and wholly conventionalized literary phenomenon. Students will learn about the theater of Lope de Vega, Calderón de la Barca, and their respective “schools.” They will explore the universal theme of “Life is a Dream” and the rich Spanish heritage of the “Don Juan” myth.

SPAN 402: Cervantes and The Quijote
A careful reading and interpretation of the first modern novel and one of the masterpieces of world literature, viewed in the context of its author’s innovative vision of the role of fiction and against the background of a world power that has begun to lose its luster.

SPAN 404: The Generation of ’98
The writings of members of the Generacion del ’98 -- essays, poetry, plays, novels -- have had profound and far- reaching consequences for the intellectual and political lives in 20th century Spain itself and in Latin America as well. In this course, major works by Unamuno, Azorin, Machado, Valle-Inclan, Baroja, and Ortega y Gasset are studied and interpreted, and the contributions of this generation to the reinvigoration of Spanish creative genius are evaluated.

SPAN 406: Spanish American Thought
The development of a group of thinkers concerned with the problem of Latin American self-identity. The course will study such authors as: Andres Bello, José Martí, José Henriquez Ureña, Carlos Fuentes and others who have contributed to the intellectual development of Spanish America.

THERAPEUTIC RECREATION  

TR 101: Foundations of Recreation and Leisure
Social, psychological, historical and economic influence on the role of therapeutic recreation, recreation, play, and leisure in contemporary American society. Trends and scope of the American recreation movement. The forces and factors affecting therapeutic recreation, play preferences, practices, and behavior. An introduction to the field of therapeutic recreation and leisure studies and a general leisure education course for non-majors.

TR 301*: Leadership and Supervision of Recreation
Group processes, leadership & supervision in recreation. Analysis of leadership techniques, methods and styles. Fundamental supervisory and personnel management functions. Prerequisite: TR 101 or permission of instructor.

TR 302*: Assessment and Therapeutic Recreation Procession
An overview of the scope of recreation services provided in institutions, medical centers, rehabilitation and community settings for individuals with physical, social, emotional, and cognitive disabilities. Characteristics of disabilities, disabling conditions, terminology, legislation, advocacy, and programming. Fieldwork of 45 hours required. Prerequisite: TR101 or permission of instructor.

TR 309: Therapeutic Recreation in Gerontology
The aging process and the illness and disabilities experienced by aging persons. Students will explore the many issues surrounding the question; how does therapeutic recreation benefit the emotional and social wellbeing of the older individual in society today. Analysis of information on lifelong, adult-onset and traumatic illnesses and disabilities experienced by aging persons. Direct client contact in the field work component to the course. Students will be required to complete no less than 45 hours in an approved therapeutic recreation setting. Competence in the areas of assessment, program design and therapeutic intervention will be developed and demonstrated. Prerequisite: TR 101 or permission of instructor.

TR 344: Therapeutic Recreation: Methods, Materials, and Process
This course is designed to develop techniques, methods, philosophy and skills in Therapeutic Recreation. Through classroom and practical application, students are provided opportunities to explore methods and materials used on T/R programming. Application to group interactions, leadership, and related intervention techniques will be explored. Prerequisite: TR 101 or permission of instructor.

TR 401*: Organizing/Administering Recreation & Leisure Services
The administration of recreation and leisure services, including marketing and public relation techniques, financial facility, and personnel management. Theories and principles of management. Prerequisite: For majors in Leisure Management, TR 301 for majors in Therapeutic Recreation, permission of instructor.

TR 402*: Therapeutic Recreation: Principles and Practices
An advanced course in therapeutic recreation, focusing on comprehensive program planning and evaluation, the therapeutic recreation process, and activity analysis. Prerequisite: TR 302.

TR 403*: Therapeutic Recreation Techniques
The application of therapeutic recreation techniques to the clinical situation. Establishing a professional helping relationship through effective communication skills. Prerequisite: TR 302.

TR 404: Conceptual and Contemporary Issues in Therapeutic Recreation
An overview of current issues in therapeutic recreation which impact service delivery in a variety of settings and agencies. This course examines conceptual, theoretical, and practical issues associated with the organization and delivery of TR services, and students develop awareness for ongoing professional development during the academic program and into their professional careers. Prerequisite: completion of three 300-level TR courses.

TR 407: Research Methods in Therapeutic Recreation
This course is intended to provide students majoring in Therapeutic Recreation with a basic overview of the techniques for conducting both qualitative and quantitative research in a clinical setting. The course focuses on the basic concepts, principles, and methods used in therapeutic recreation research from idea formulation through data collection, analysis and interpretation. Prerequisite: TR 302, TR 309, TR 402 and no less than 3 Psychology courses.

TR 410*: Recreation and Leisure Practicum
Supervised experience in a professional setting. Prerequisite: permission of instructor; TR 101, 201, 301, 302, 401 and permission of instructor.

TR 411*: Internship in Therapeutic Recreation (9 credits)
The assignment of 500 hours, consecutively experienced at one agency with supervision by a Certified Recreation Therapist. Meets requirements for certification by the National Council of Therapeutic Recreation Certification. Prerequisites: TR 101, 201, 301, 302, 402 and permission of instructor. Register no later than Fall of senior year. Not offered during summer sessions.

*These courses often require practical fieldwork outside of the classroom.

 

rule
 

School of Arts & Sciences

School of Business

School of Education

Academic Affairs

Admissions

 

 

     

© St. Thomas Aquinas College 125 Route 340, Sparkill, NY 10976 845-398-4000

Home | Admissions | Academics | Athletics | Email | Give to STAC | Jobs@STAC | Press Room
follow us follow us visit us join apply